Contributed

Why Large Organizations Fail at Digital Transformation

Article Written by Sanjay Zalavadia, VP of Client Services, Zephyr

Legacy systems and processes are still being relied on for a number of mission-critical tasks across businesses, but these outdated approaches are starting to show their age in a lot of ways. Many companies have gravitated toward digital transformation as a means of improving capabilities and ensuring that they are able to keep up with the competition in the future.

However, a majority of these initiatives don't succeed. Consultancy.uk noted that while 80 percent of managers believe that technology is here to stay, two-thirds of digital transformation efforts fail. With bigger companies investing billions a year on these projects, it's important to ensure that deliver the expected results. Let's take a look at the biggest reasons that large organizations fail at digital transformation:

1. Not agile enough

How to Organize Your Corporate Wiki On the Cloud



Since there are many companies today that has offices around the world and they have a lot of employees who travel back and forth from one office to another, their business methods need a lot of changes in order to make it work. 

Besides the fact that their offices are separated by thousands of miles, they still need to be able to communicate, share information and ideas in order to come up with coordinated business incentives. Additionally, most of those scattered business organizations have a lot of things to consider and they require sophisticated solutions that will allow them to function properly. 

This is where an online wiki software comes into play. It allows organizations to share different types of information between them in a simple, yet very effective way. Still, this is not the only thing you can do with cloud-based wiki software and we will focus upon that a bit more. 

Law and Order: How The Cloud Can Provide Your Police Department With Ironclad Failover

Police are increasingly relying on digital infrastructure. The problem is that if that if it fails, lives could be at stake. Here's how the cloud can help.

In January, Canadian police were hit with a major network outage that prevented them from accessing critical resources required to do their jobs. The outage, it is reported, started around 11:30 PM ET on Wednesday, January 18, and continued until 3 PM ET on the 19. Evidently, the whole thing originated with a router failure which also impacted "mobile computer workstations in RCMP police cruisers and two other crucial internal RCMP databases," according to CBC news.

This is not the first such outage suffered by the organization - their networks have reportedly gone down "more than a dozen times since last spring," reports CBC.

HPE Acquires SimpliVity for $650 Million, Another Proof Point for HCI

Article Written by David Marshall

This month, HP Enterprise (HPE) announced an agreement to acquire Hyperconverged Infrastructure (HCI) vendor Simplivity for $650M.  The acquisition highlights the growing popularity of consolidated computing systems that CIOs are adopting as an alternative to public cloud services, and suggests that on-premises computing systems still remain a crucial option for many organizations.

SimpliVity is but one of many companies offering hyperconverged systems which bundle computing, storage and networking onto the same server.  The company's flagship product is called the OmniCube hyperconverged infrastructure appliance, and they've been working with hardware vendors such as Lenovo, Dell, Cisco and Huawei to bring the software portion of its solution to those vendors' hardware platforms.

SimpliVity was founded in 2009, and over the last couple of years, they raised almost $276 million in four funding rounds led by Waypoint Capital, Accel Partners, Charles River Ventures, DFJ Growth, Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers (KPCB) and Meritech Capital Partners.  When the company raised its Series D round of $175 million in March of 2015, the company was estimated to be worth as much as $1 billion.

 

Tintri Levels Up Data Protection and Disaster Recovery for its Enterprise Cloud Platform

Article Written by David Marshall

Virtualization-aware storage provider Tintri is adding more data protection and disaster recovery to its platform and expanding its software suite with automated Synchronous Replication. The company says it fully integrating primary and secondary storage to protect enterprise cloud investments with a DP/DR solution that comprises Tintri VMstore arrays and Tintri Software Suite. Tintri also works with data backup solutions from Veeam and Commvault for secondary storage, and will soon also offer native protection of Tintri snapshots from on-premises to public cloud storage through an Amazon S3 Connector.

The new Synchronous Replication feature is part of the Tintri Software Suite, which also consists of Tintri Global Center, ReplicateVM and SecureVM.

The capabilities of the DP/DR solution includes:

New Massive Community Initiative from StratoScale: The Private Cloud Wiki

Article Written by David Marshall

Many organizations are using VMware, OpenStack and other technologies to take their clouds in-house, building private cloud infrastructures to reduce their costs and dependence on providers like Amazon AWS.  Anyone who has already ventured on a private cloud project has more than likely encountered the enormous complexity of the field, at every level: business, architecture, infrastructure, virtualization, and workload management.

With that in mind, I recently spoke with the team at Stratoscale - the maker of Symphony, a tool that sets up a private cloud with AWS-like capabilities on your local machines in minutes - and found out that they have set out to make private cloud more accessible, not just for cloud infrastructure specialists, but also for ordinary IT and DevOps professionals who want to better understand how they can leverage this technology.  To do that, they have created something that has totally blown me away!  They have taken it upon themselves to build a Private Cloud Wiki.  After spending quite some time navigating it, I'm dubbing it a 'must visit knowledge hub' that collects all the relevant information on private cloud technology from around the world, and organizes it in a meaningful structure:

 

How the Cloud Can Simplify Studying for RN to MSN Online Programs

 
As a registered nurse working in a hospital, your job is one of the busiest and most stressful of all healthcare positions. You are not only in charge of a number of patients on the floor but the LPNs and Nursing Assistants on your team answer to you as well. Your day is packed with communicating with doctors, talking to patients' families, discussing treatments with your LPN and Nursing Assistant and, of course, seeing to the care of your patients as well.

You also respond to any queries at the nurses' station and communicate with support staff as needed. As if that wasn't enough, you have decided to go for your masters degree in nursing, which can overwhelm you if you don't find a few ways to make better use of your time. That would be what the Cloud is for and why every online masters degree in nursing program should encourage their students to use  the Cloud when pursuing an advanced nursing degree.
 

4 Ways Cloud Computing Resembles Human Resource Management

As online business has become increasingly centered around cloud computing, many analysts have begun drawing the comparison between human resources and server resources. After all, both are integral assets that facilitate mission-critical tasks for companies of all sizes, and both need to be managed properly in order to achieve optimal results. However, studying for a masters in business administration online is enough to make anyone realize that the similarities actually go much further than meets the eye. With that said, here are four ways that cloud computing administration resembles the management of human resources in business:

1. Distributing Workload Evenly for Maximum Productivity

How the Cloud Has Changed Education as We Know It

The cloud has impacted many aspects of everyone's everyday life, from the classroom to the workplace and everything in between. But how has the cloud changed education, in particular? Keep reading to learn about a few of the ways that this 21st century technology is helping teachers instruct better, and helping students learn better, even when they're in tough MBA programs online.

Collaboration Is a Snap

Thanks to cloud technology, collaboration with people from all over the globe is easier than ever. There are plenty of ways that you can create files, share them, edit them, and more when you use free products, such as Google Docs, as well as other types of software and apps that are designed for professional collaboration. Everyone from the high school student to the student enrolled in an online MBA program can use the cloud to work on projects with fellow students, as well as share their work with their instructors.

5 Cloud Trends to Watch in 2017

It's almost impossible to believe that just a few short years ago, the cloud was a new idea, and more than a few experts were convinced that it was never going to be more than a passing trend. There is no doubt now that the cloud has been one of the most transformative technologies of the last decade, and an important part of any business. In fact, a study by Cisco found that by the end of this decade, it's likely that more than 80 percent of all data center traffic will be cloud based. It's no longer a question of if a business should move some or all of their functions to the cloud, but a question of how to best leverage the technology for the greatest benefit.

With that in mind, there are some trends in how businesses are using the cloud that are likely to be the major stories of 2017.