Contributed

5 Different Ways People Use Cloud Computing

Grazed from CenturyLink.  Author: Editorial Staff.

The Cloud used to be nothing more than an enigma, a buzz word. Now, the Cloud has made itself a necessity for many people in many different situations. In order to take advantage of all the great advantages of the Cloud, you first need an Internet service to rely on. View CenturyLink deals to find an affordable and fast Internet plan that you can use to access the Cloud.

Using a Cloud service is something that is universal, but also personal. Here are some of the ways that people are taking the Cloud, and using it in a way that suits their specific needs...
 
1.    Studying. High school students to grad students are all looking for ways to make studying easier. One of the best ways to do that is with the Cloud. Google docs, Google hangouts and platforms like Evernote make it simple for students to share ideas. The Cloud is changing not only how students study, but when.  Students don’t even need to deal with the mess of setting up specific times to meet up. Share notes, mock tests, study guides and more virtually, instead of personally. What makes the Cloud even more beneficial to students is that if you lose your notes or your computer melts down without saving, all the material you need is already stored in the Cloud waiting for you...

Cloud security: What works and what doesn’t work in cloud

Contributed Article.  Author: Charles Smith.

CloudCow Contributed ArticleThe growing rate of adoption of cloud based technology has also given rise to a growing concern about deficient security policies in its utilization. Many companies allow their employees to access data and files from their office cloud but have no definite or distinct cloud security policies. There is a nagging dearth of written down best practices for cloud utilization. The concerns are arising at multiple levels such as -

•    Compliance with government regulations
•    Exit strategies
•    Lock in periods
•    International data privacy
•    Credibility and consistency of suppliers
•    Service assurance and testing 
•    Integration between cloud and existing systems

Worried About the Cloud? Always Plan Ahead

Contributed Article.  Author: Tim Sedlack, Senior Product Manager, Quest Software (now part of Dell)
CloudCow Contributed Article
 

Worried About the Cloud? Always Plan Ahead

I talk to IT departments around the world about compliance and auditing. These are people who are part of large, global organizations to small 1 man IT shops. What I can tell you seems to be a universal truth today – they are all worried about the cloud. They are worried about security and the cloud, they are worried about the seemingly unending ways corporate data can get to the cloud and they are worried about engaging with auditors and having to prove control over resources that have ended up in the cloud, usually without their knowledge.

I can certainly understand the concern – it’s a big wide world and it seems like it’s all out their control. Well, for the most part, it is.

Relational database vs non-relational database: All you need to know

Contributed Article.  Author: 10gen - The MongoDB Company
CloudCow Contributed Article
 

Relational database vs non-relational database: All you need to know


The debate over relational databases and non-relational databases has been ongoing for quite some time. A few years ago, the argument was mostly one sided in favor of relational databases (SQL) because most of the applications developers were creating were focused on transactional data and the social and mobile explosion could be treated more like a trend than a reality.  However, as we’re beginning to see from companies such as Amazon, Netflix, and MTV Networks, modern applications need the flexibility and scalability of a non-relational database (NoSQL) that rely on bigger data and faster write performance. Modern applications with social components and product recommendations based on user data don’t fit RDBMS.
 
This shift has led some to question if we’re witnessing the end of relational database systems. In a world where cloud computing is really beginning to take over and blossom, NoSQL databases simply make more sense for several reasons. But is saying that relational databases are coming to an end an overstatement?

Cloud, Control or Both

Contributed Article.  Author: Tri Nguyen, CISSP, MCSE, Manager, Product Management in the Windows Management Group at Quest Software (now part of Dell)
CloudCow Contributed Article
 

Cloud, Control or Both

 
Everywhere I look, it’s Cloud, cloud, cloud…  So it’s clear that the cloud is here, but the question I have is this: if organizations go to Cloud, do they lose control and, secondarily, do they care?  Let’s start by defining Cloud. For the purposes of this article, my definition of Cloud is any service with which your important, enterprise data might be stored somewhere that your IT department does not specifically own: Office 365, Google Apps/Docs, Dropbox, etc. There are advantages to leveraging these services, but there also are disadvantages. Some of your challenges go away (hint: they are not all bad things to rid yourself of, but there are new challenges you have to consider, as well). For example:
 

Email Overload from the Exchange Admin's Point of View

Contributed Article.  Author: Connie West, Senior Product Advisor at Quest Software (now a part of Dell)
CloudCow Contributed Article
 

Email Overload from the Exchange Admin's Point of View


Think about all the content that’s locked in your email, and then multiply that by the number of employees in your organization. That’s a LOT of content! Michael Osterman notes in “The Importance of Email Continuity,” that “email is not solely about communications – just as important as access to email for communications is its role as a repository of critical business information.”

Is it a repository of critical business information? You bet it is. Think about everything that happens in email: deals are negotiated, corporate decisions are discussed, ideas are vetted, and support cases are discussed and closed. I could go on, but you get the picture. It’s an ever-growing repository of corporate intelligence.

Email Reporting in the Cloud

Contributed Article.  Author: Joel Blaiberg, product manager for unified communications at Quest Software, now a part of Dell
CloudCow Contributed Article
 

Email Reporting in the Cloud

 
So, you're migrating your email users to the cloud? Great! And you want to discuss reporting? No problem! Now, what kind of reporting are you interested in?
 
Believe it or not, as a product manager for an email reporting solution, I have similar conversations with customers and prospects. The problem is that once you have migrated your hardware and storage platforms from on-premise to the cloud, some of what previously kept you up at night has effectively been outsourced. For example, you need not worry about server performance or the size of mail databases ─ they’re no longer your (direct) problem. Of course, depending on your service provider, you may be charged by the number of user subscriptions and/or the amount of mail data you are storing. Similarly there are other data points you may be concerned about. Here are just a few examples:

Which cloud do I choose?

Contributed Article.  Author: Ron Robbins, Quest Software, now part of Dell
CloudCow Contributed Article
 

Which cloud do I choose?

 
Let’s say that you have done all the research, looked at all the pros and cons, and already decided that Office 365 is the solution for your company. You definitely want the ease of administration, the guaranteed up-time, and the low cost that Office 365 offers. Then, you come across a web advertisement for Hosted Exchange. Now your decision just became complicated! Do you go to Office 365 or one of the many third-party hosted Exchange service providers available? There are some differences, and some advantages, that these third parties can provide. Let me see if I can help you with your decision.
 
Hosted Exchange has been around since long before BPOS and Office 365 have been available. Whether it is a dedicated solution or a multi-tenant solution, customers have known the cost savings and reliability some of these hosted solutions provide. Third-party hosted Exchange solutions can provide many different benefits and features. Here are just a few:

Why SaaS Makes Sense for IT Projects

Contributed Article.  Author: Shawn Barker, senior product manager at Quest Software (now part of Dell)
CloudCow Contributed Article
 

Why SaaS Makes Sense for IT Projects

 
Software as a Service (SaaS) is not a new trend, by any means. Most of us have been using cloud-based email and online services for conference meetings for some time. But what about systems management or IT tasks that typically have been accomplished with software that is installed on our own servers? On-premises software can be overkill for in-and-out projects such as a compliance audit or an email migration.
 
SaaS offers a number of benefits over traditional software. So, while SaaS might be an easy choice for email or conferencing, here are a few compelling reasons to consider a SaaS offering for your next IT project:

Why Notes Applications Migrations are Different From Other Types of Migrations

Contributed Article.  Author: Steve Walch, senior product manager, Quest Software, now part of Dell
CloudCow Contributed Article
 

Why Notes Applications Migrations are Different From Other Types of Migrations

The company I work for makes a lot of migration tools, and we get to see a large variety of migration projects. These projects range from weekend “self-service” projects to very large projects run by global system integrators. They may be driven by a variety of factors ─ mergers; a change in platform vendors; consolidation or other cost cutting projects; a move to the cloud; or simply by a desire to leverage the latest and greatest technologies. Most of the migration projects we see are moves to the Microsoft platform, including: