Medical

Is Cloud-Based Technology the Key to Treating Chronic Disease?

Article Written by Avery Phillips

Despite being one of the most technologically advanced countries in the world, the United States still harbors one of the most unhealthy populations. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, seven of the top 10 causes of death are chronic illnesses, and nearly half of American adults are afflicted with at least one chronic health issue. Despite having limitless knowledge at our fingertips, we still can't seem to get our health in check. 

However, we do have one technology that shows promise in tackling this widespread dilemma: the cloud. Not only does the cloud further research and help with the management of chronic diseases, it can help prevent them too. Hybrid cloud computing, health apps, and internet of things (IoT) can all take part in the improvement of people's health and healthcare in general. Need a little more information? Here's what you need to know.

Improving Disease Research

Medsphere Migrates Acute and Ambulatory EHRs to the Cloud

Grazed from Medsphere Systems Corporation

Medsphere Systems Corporation, the leading provider of affordable and interoperable healthcare information technology (IT) solutions and services, has moved into cloud-based services with the implementation of the company’s OpenVista electronic health record (EHR) at the Behavioral Center of Michigan and Samaritan Behavioral Center. The fully cloud-based version of OpenVista gives both Detroit-area facilities and other current and future clients greater accessibility and saves the expense of local servers and data centers.

The successful Behavioral Center go-live is confirmation of Medsphere’s cloud and software-as-a-service (SaaS) strategy, which is also currently being rolled out at other client sites.
 

The Healthcare Sector Will Invest $5.4 Billion in Cloud Computing by 2017

Grazed from CloudTimes. Author: Saroj Kar.

Cloud computing services are increasingly moving into the future in health care. However, the protection and security of private data are two of the main reasons why the healthcare sector is generally slow to adopt new technologies. Market researchers at MarketsandMarkets assume that the health care industry will invest $5.4 Billion in Cloud Computing by 2017.

The “Healthcare Cloud Computing (Clinical, EMR, SaaS, Private, Public, Hybrid) Market – Global Trends, Challenges, Opportunities & Forecasts (2012 – 2017)”, published by MarketsandMarkets, analyzes and studies the major market drivers, restraints, and opportunities in North America, Europe, Asia, and Rest of the World. According to the report, Market researchers estimate that last year at least 4% of total health care are changed into the cloud. This year, this share is expected to grow to 20.5%...

Accumedic Launches New AccuMed Cloud Solution

Grazed from PRWeb. Author: PR Announcement.

Accumedic Computer Systems, Inc., provider of intelligent EHR solutions, announced the launch of AccuMed™ Cloud. It’s the latest evolution of their comprehensive agency management solutions for behavioral health. Now AccuMed™ EHR, the ONC certified software that seamlessly integrates every aspect of clinical documentation and revenue cycles, can be delivered as a service (SaaS) via the AccuMed secure cloud data center.

The AccuMed cloud solution provides increased accessibility, greater workflow efficiency, and improved security over traditional client-server systems. Users can enjoy the complete functionality of any AccuMed system and access all of their clinical data wherever there is an Internet connection. There is no software to install or IT infrastructure to maintain. All that is required to leverage the power of the AccuMed Cloud is a Windows tablet, laptop or PC. The AccuMed Cloud provides HIPAA compliant security with top-level data encryption. All data is housed in SSAE 16 compliant data centers at multiple locations with bank-level security ensuring data safety and security in the event of a disaster...

Cloud Computing Meets HIPAA Omnibus: A Provider Checklist

Grazed from AdvanceWeb. Author: Sharlene George.

Cloud computing and storage is an undeniable migration path and IT strategy. Overall spending on cloud technology is expected to reach an estimated $150 billion annually by 2014, according to a recent Gartner Group study. And within healthcare, 35 percent of health IT professionals surveyed said their organization was implementing or maintaining cloud computing in 2012, up from 30 percent in 2011, according to a new survey by Vernon Hills, Ill., technology vendor CDW.

However, not every software application in healthcare is a candidate for moving to the cloud. And many old myths about cloud computing and cloud storage continue to confuse both covered entities (CEs) and business associates (BAs). The HIPAA omnibus rule, released in January 2013, basically incorporates the HITECH Act security provisions into HIPAA, confirming the security and privacy requirements in the utilization of technology in healthcare. Below are five key changes under the HIPAA Omnibus Rule:...

Cloud-Computing Tools For Doctors And Physicians

Grazed from CloudTweaks. Author: Rick Blaisdell.

As we discussed in an older article, cloud computing technologies are on the rise in the healthcare industry. From large hospitals to physicians and administrators to small medical services providers, all have seen cost savings from implementing and utilizing cloud-based solutions. Today we will focus more on small medical services providers and on how they can use cloud computing technologies. Here are the cloud-based solutions most used by doctors and physicians:

Cloud storage. Information storage is of major importance for doctors as they need to keep medical records, notes, test results, cardiology and radiology images, available and secure. There are two alternatives when it comes to cloud storage solutions for medical services: the electronic medical record solution (EMR) and the electronic health record solution (EHR)...

Cloud Computing: HIPAA's Role

Grazed from Gov Info Security. Author: Marianne Kolbasuk McGee.

While a privacy advocate is demanding federal guidance on how to protect health information in the cloud, one federal official says the soon-to-be-modified HIPAA privacy and security rules will apply to all business associates, including cloud vendors, helping to ensure patient data is safeguarded. Joy Pritts, chief privacy officer in the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT, a unit of the Department of Health and Human Services, made her comments about HIPAA during a Jan. 7 panel discussion on cloud computing hosted by Patient Privacy Rights, an advocacy group.

The movement of health information to the cloud is inevitable, Pritts acknowledged. That's particularly true for smaller healthcare organizations that are turning to cloud providers to host electronic health records to help reduce start-up costs...

3 steps to HIPAA security in the cloud

Grazed from GovHealthIT. Author: David Linthicum.

The default response for those charged with HIPAA security is to say ‘no’ to cloud computing. Why? Clouds are not under direct control, they are not typically up on existing and emerging healthcare regulations, and, most importantly, they are new and scary. There is a clear need, however, to rethink the role of cloud computing by those charged with HIPAA security. The efficiencies that can be gained by leveraging public, private, and hybrid clouds are just too compelling.

The trick is to understand the existing requirements, and then understand how the emerging use of cloud computing could provide compliant and secure HIPAA solutions. In many cases, leveraging cloud computing will improve upon the best practices and technology that exist today. Here are three steps to using HIPAA in the cloud:...

Dell Leading With Industry's Largest Cloud-based, Vendor-neutral Medical Archive

Grazed from BusinessWire. Author: PR Announcement.

With a string of new customers and alliances with strategic partners for its cloud-based medical image archive platform, Dell has been recognized as one of the largest healthcare cloud computing providers in the industry.

In September, Frost & Sullivan recognized Dell Healthcare and Life Sciences with its 2012 North American Company of the Year Award, based on the firm's analysis of the enterprise imaging informatics market. "In addition to operating the industry's largest public cloud for medical imaging, Dell is also ideally positioned for the implementation of private clouds within multisite hospital and imaging center networks," said Nadim Daher, principal analyst at Frost & Sullivan...

Cloud computing is a key component on the path to personalised medicine

Grazed from MTB Europe. Author: Dr. James Coffin.

When scientists embarked on the 13-year journey to map the human genome in 1990, they envisioned a future where the knowledge of DNA would aid in the diagnosis, treatment and even prevention of thousands of diseases and disorders.

Fast forward to 2012 and that dream is closer to reality thanks to ongoing advances at the nexus of high-performance computing and genomics research. Though we have yet to identify cures for diseases such as cancer and AIDS, personalised treatments based on a patient’s molecular makeup — as opposed to a “one size fits all” approach — are optimising and extending lives...