Cloud Adoption

FCA green lights cloud technologies

Grazed from BankingTech. Author: Editorial Staff.

Cloud technology has been around for years now and we are all using it in some ways. If you have an iPhone, then you are using the iCloud all day every day without even realising it. Your DropBox, your Google Drive, your Amazon account are all using cloud computing. At work, it’s your Microsoft One Drive or your Evernote application on your tablet that uses the cloud.

We are constantly connected to it and yet, in financial services, the adoption has been tremendously slow. In part, this is due to a lack of guidance from regulators, especially where cloud-based regulation technology is concerned. Finally there is forward progress. The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) in the UK has taken a real step forward to embrace innovation in its recent paper looking at cloud technology, which gives firms clear guidance in the procurement and monitoring of cloud technology providers...

Cloud Computing: Microsoft Predicts Four Green Tech Developments in 2017

Grazed from WinBuzzer. Author: Sead Fadilpasic.

The predictions are courtesy of Rob Bernard, Chief Environmental Strategist at Microsoft. He believes that the energy sector will be a primary benefactor of green tech, relying more and more on renewable sources. According to Bernard, the world will continue the struggle with water shortages in 2017, raising awareness on the issue. Furthermore, we will increasingly use data to make sense of natural developments while leveraging cloud-based technologies in the process.

IoT and Cloud Computing will begin to transform utility energy management

Bernard first prediction is about energy management. He states that the existing infrastructures will need to cope with the increasing amount of energy produced. As a result, IoT and cloud computing will be in the forefront, helping manage energy collection and distribution. “2017 will see an increased investment by utilities in technology to leverage data, through IoT solutions and cloud computing, to make energy management more predictable, flexible and efficient.”...

Read more from the source @ http://winbuzzer.com/2016/12/19/microsoft-predicts-four-green-tech-developments-in-2017-xcxwbn/

10 trends that will influence cloud computing in 2017

Grazed from InformationAge. Author: Editorial Staff.

For most organisations the question is no longer whether it is appropriate to adopt cloud, but when is the right time and what services to move.Meanwhile, early adopters should be reviewing their portfolio to ensure they are getting best value and optimum service, as cloud providers are constantly developing and updating their offerings. These are the key cloud trends to look out for in 2017.

1. Enterprise cloud

At the moment, the term’ enterprise cloud’ is generally taken to mean virtualised in-house environments with an element of user self-service and reporting. Hyperconvergence is often described as enterprise cloud.However, ‘true’ enterprise cloud should be a common suite of design, provisioning, management and reporting tools controlling hybrid clouds that allow each service to be hosted and controlled on the most appropriate platform. That’s irrespective of whether these are public, private, hybrid, community, hosted or any combination...

Read more from the source @ http://www.information-age.com/10-trends-that-will-influence-cloud-computing-in-2017-123463713/

ZTE makes case for link between fog computing and cloud to bolster 5G, IoT

Grazed from RCRWireless. Author: Dan Meyer.

In a move to combine what it sees as similar technology attributes, ZTE offered up a support for combining work being conducted in cloud and fog computing. Participating in the International Telecommunications Union’s Eighth CTO meeting in Thailand, the vendor said it analyzed online video, augmented reality, virtual reality, large-scale “internet of things” and other application scenarios in pointing out similar concepts behind fog computing and multi-access edge computing.

Those efforts were said to be placed under a “cloud-fog collaboration” system architecture. ZTE explained that while a solid cloud platform is required to deal with the generation, transmission and processing of massive data, performance and latency requirements for AR and VR in particular will require edge-based platforms...

The cloud and the CIO - the cloud is still out of control - part 1

Grazed from TheCSuite. Author: Grant MacDonald.

With IDC recently predicting that IT infrastructure spending will grow at a CAGR of 15.1% from 2014 to 2019, and given that spending on cloud will be 46% of the entire IT budget – it’s clear that now is the time harness the best that the cloud has to offer. Research commissioned by Fruition Partners in 2015 showed that CIOs had a range of serious concerns over cloud control. This year, the research was repeated and it looks as though little has changed.

The research found that 80 per cent of CIOs do not apply the same comprehensive IT service management processes to cloud as they do for in-house IT services. When compared to last year’s figures, the research found while there has been a slight improvement in overall cloud maturity, we’ve still got a long way to go. In fact, more than 85 per cent of CIOs still say that the proliferation of public cloud computing services is reducing the control their organisation has over the IT services it uses. CIOs are highly concerned by the negative impacts of this trend, with three-quarters of them saying it leads to financial waste, and increases the business and security risks to the organisation...

Cloud convenience is killing the open source database

Grazed from InfoWorld. Author: Matt Asay.

Open source has never been more important or, ironically, irrelevant. As developers increasingly embrace the cloud to shorten time to market, they're speeding past open source, making it even harder to build an open source business. After all, if open source were largely a way for developers to skirt legal and purchasing departments to get the software they needed when they needed it, the cloud ups that convenience to the nth degree. In Accel's annual business review, the vaunted venture capital firm writes: "'Product' is no longer just the bits of software, it's also how the software is sold, supported, and made successful." The cloud is changing the way all software is consumed, including open source.

The cloud is eating your database

The database market, where open source databases like MySQL and Postgres have dominated adoption for years, makes the shift to cloud readily apparent. Even among this open source elite, the cloud is making waves. More recently, MongoDB, Cassandra, and Redis have climbed to rank among the top 10 most popular databases, as shown in DB-Engines most recent findings...

Read more from the source @ http://www.infoworld.com/article/3147864/cloud-computing/cloud-convenience-is-killing-the-open-source-database.html

DevOps Drives the Move to a Cloud-First World

Grazed from BaseLine. Author: Eileen McCooey.

Fulfilling predictions made 20 years ago, cloud computing has reached the tipping point, with the majority of enterprises now opting for a cloud-first strategy. Just over half of the 1,850 mid- to senior-level managers participating in "The 2016 Cloud Computing Tipping Point Survey," commissioned by ServiceNow, said they prefer to host new apps and services in the cloud rather than in a traditional data center.

That number is expected to climb to three out of four within the next two years. The study reveals that DevOps is fueling the shift to a cloud-first world, uncovering data center bottlenecks that could be resolved with cloud computing. In a worrisome indication for IT, nearly nine out of 10 survey participants reported that their IT staff doesn't have the skills to help them make the shift to a cloud-first strategy...

Nearly All Data Center Traffic Will Be in the Cloud by 2020

Grazed from PointAndBeyond. Author: Kelley Katsanos.

A recent Cisco white paper projects cloud data center traffic will exceed 14 zettabytes (ZB) in 2020 — a 262-percent increase from 2015, according to a report in Data Center Knowledge. Also by 2020, 92 percent of all workloads will be in the cloud, and total global traffic will reach 15.3 ZB annually.

Data Center Traffic Projections by Cisco

The Cisco Global Cloud Index white paper shows that the number of Hyperscale data centers will grow from 259 at the end of 2015 to 485 by 2020. Moreover, most traffic through data centers will move from private to public clouds this year, and, according to Data Center Knowledge, “public cloud will continue to grow by 35 percent CAGR throughout the forecast period (compared to 15 percent for private), boosted by demand for cost efficiency and agility, along with strengthening public cloud security.”...

Read more from the source @ http://pointbandbeyond.com/news/nearly-all-data-center-traffic-will-be-in-the-cloud-by-2020/

Serendipity in the Cloud

Grazed from Strategy-Business. Author: Matt Palmquist.

As managers face increasing pressure from stakeholders to make supply chains eco-friendly, companies are on the hunt for new and inexpensive tools, partners, or processes that can improve the sustainability of their operations. But according to a new study, one solution may already exist: Cloud computing could improve supply chains’ environmental performance while also cutting costs.

When firms move their data from in-house servers to the cloud, they can save money on maintaining IT infrastructure and storage. Hosting applications, information, and networks on the cloud, typically through a third-party service at a much lower cost than a physical setup, also allows companies to quickly analyze and disseminate data, loop in partners, and scale their technology needs to accommodate changing budget and business requirements...

Read more from the source @ http://www.strategy-business.com/blog/Serendipity-in-the-Cloud

Getting "Moore" Out of Your Cloud

Grazed from CIOReview. Author: Editorial Staff.

As many of you in the technology industry are aware, in 1965, Dr. Gordon Moore, co-founder of Intel, observed that the number of transistors producible within a silicon wafer could economically double every year. Although the doubling rate has been revised several times since then, the prediction has served as a target and benchmark for semiconductor technology growth.

Moore’s law has fueled exponential computing advancements over the last several decades. For example, we have seen microprocessors with a few thousand transistors and kilobytes of memory transform into multi-core server chips with billions of transistors, gigahertz clock rates, and equally impressive storage and networking capabilities...