Cloud Adoption

Microsoft opens up over local cloud regulations

Grazed from Reseller. Author: Hafizah Osman.

Microsoft has launched a digital guide to cloud regulations in Asia Pacific, aimed at helping key decision makers when it comes to the adoption of cloud. Specifically, in Australia, the guide is set out to achieve efficiency, cost savings, strategic business objectives and to enhance levels of security and privacy compared with existing on-premises solutions.

According to Microsoft, Australia is one of the most advanced markets in the Asia Pacific region for the adoption of cloud computing and locally, many organisations are leveraging cloud services for the benefit of their employees or customers. As a result, with the guide, it claims that organisations can move to the cloud in a way that meets all applicable security and privacy requirements...

Read more from the source @ https://www.reseller.co.nz/article/625806/microsoft-launches-local-digital-guide-cloud-regulations/

Cloud computing is consolidating, raising the risk of customer lock-in

Grazed from SiliconAngle. Author: Paul Gillin.

Barely a decade into the cloud revolution, consolidation is already setting in, and the implications for customers aren’t good. That’s according to a new report from Forrester Research Inc. The three areas of greatest consolidation are currently in the base-level computing and storage known as infrastructure as a service, desktop applications delivered via the cloud and customer relationship management.

The three largest providers in those markets already collectively hold 70 percent or more of subscription revenues and are unlikely to see their market shares decline, Forrester said. However, not everything is consolidating so quickly. Markets for electronic purchasing, supply chain management, human resources and financial management systems are still wide open. What’s more, the authors point out, far more money is still being spent on on-premises software than on cloud services...

Google’s cloud gets a boost as Forrester names it a leader in data analytics

Grazed from SiliconAngle. Author: Mike Wheatley.

Google Inc.’s efforts to establish itself as a major player in cloud computing received a small boost Wednesday when it was named by research firm Forrester Inc. as the undisputed leader in a part of the market Forrester calls “Insight Platform-as-a-Service.” It should be noted that Insight PaaS is just a small subsection of the overall PaaS market, so Google still has some way to go.

Forrester defines the Insight PaaS category as an integrated set of data management, analytics and insight application development and management components, offered as a platform. PaaS more generally is the middle layer of cloud computing, customarily defined as services to allow software developers to create applications that run on the Internet...

Multi-cloud: the future of computing

Grazed from ITWeb. Author: Richard Vester.

Cloud computing has revolutionised the way people work, consume applications, and the way they store their data. However, although it was born out of the need to simplify IT environments and make their business lives far easier, today, many companies are opting to have many cloud vendors, instead of just one. Multi-cloud is the future of computing. A recent Dimensional Research survey found 77% of businesses are planning to implement multi-cloud architectures in the near future.

Many businesses want to have different options, and will choose to use multiple cloud providers to support their various workloads and applications. They can select a cloud that will best meet their individual requirements. It's a matter of not putting all their IT eggs in one basket. The flexibility of multi-cloud is one of the main drivers behind its increased adoption...

The Cloud Vs. In-House Infrastructure: Deciding Which Is Best For Your Organization

Grazed from Forbes. Author: Alex Lesser.

Fueled by mounting storage requirements, ease of use, automatic software updates and users’ thirst for limitless access and maximum flexibility, cloud computing has grown exponentially over the past several years. In fact, since 2009, spending on cloud computing has been growing at a rate that is 4.5 times faster than the rate of IT spending, and it's expected to exceed six times the rate from 2015 to 2020.

This is certainly because there are many situations in which utilizing the cloud makes sense. The most obvious would be in a small startup operating on a lean budget where cash flow is tight. This is because cloud computing allows access to resources without large capital expenditures. The cloud can also be an option for enterprises of all sizes as it relates to disaster recovery...

Microsoft Reaps Rewards of Its Cloud-Computing Business

Grazed from NewYorkTimes. Author: Editorial Staff.

A few years ago, Microsoft appeared to be another tech has-been, having whiffed on its efforts to compete in mobile phones and internet search. Although it is too soon to say whether Microsoft can pull off a full-blown renaissance the way Apple has, the company is firmly back in favor.

Not long after its shares reached another all-time high at the close of regular trading, Microsoft reported on Thursday that its profit in the most recent quarter more than doubled from a year ago. One reason for that jump was the failure of its mobile phone business, which produced big losses for the company in past years, yielding a $1.8 billion tax benefit that Microsoft was able to recognize last quarter...

Trump presidency could 'cost the US cloud computing industry $10BN'

Grazed from IA. Author: Editorial Staff.

The US cloud computing industry stands to lose more than $10 billion by 2020 as a result of President Trump’s increasingly shaky reputation on data privacy, according to Meier.Despite only being in power since the start of 2017, Donald Trump has had a significant impact on the way America is viewed around the world.

In fact, the latest study from the the Pew Research Center highlights that just 22% of people have confidence in President Trump to do the right thing when it comes to international affairs, compared to 64% who felt they could trust Barack Obama.This coincides with a rapid increase in people expressing unfavourable opinions about the US more generally...

The Future of Work: Freelancers Are the New Cloud Computing

Grazed from Entrepreneur. Author: Phill Strazzulla.

One of the greatest innovations for tech entrepreneurs over the last few decades has been cloud computing. The ability to move capital expenditures to operating expenditures is huge. It’s also incredibly empowering to scale your computing power as your business changes. You’ve also got the added advantage of a built-in platform with various tools to handle analytics, error logging, etc. Needless to say, cloud computing has changed the game.

We now seem to be entering a new phase of the future of work where traditional employees can be replaced more and more by freelancers who live and work remotely. This new paradigm reminds me of the rise of cloud computing a lot in terms of the utility, and its potentially disruptive nature...

Cloud Computing Protest Offers Lessons For Buyers & Suppliers

Grazed from PublicSpendingForum. Author: Frank McNally.

A recent protest decision from the Government Accountability Office (GAO) provides several important lessons for procurement professionals who are buying cloud-enabled services as well as vendors hoping to sell them. Let's dive in! Red River Computing Company protested the Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) request for quotations (RFQ) for agency-wide enterprise computing services and cloud computing services.

Red River challenged both the technical and price evaluation, asserting that DHS's best-value determination was flawed. GAO denied Red River's challenge of the technical evaluation but sustained its challenge of the price evaluation. Each decision is instructive, so let's take a closer look...

How to approach cloud computing and cyber security in 2017

Grazed from Information-Age. Author: Ben Rossi.

The adoption of cloud computing has been on the up since as far back as 2008, when a survey conducted by the Pew Research Institute found that cloud services were used by nearly 69% of Americans. Since then, the industry has experienced hyper-growth and exceeded the already vast predictions of how big it would become.

IDC predicts that the cloud computing market in 2017 will be worth $107 billion and, according to Gartner, by 2020 a corporate ‘no-cloud’ policy will be as unusual as a ‘no-internet’ policy would be today. Indeed, it would be difficult to imagine an organisation in 2017 that did not use webmail, file sharing and storage, and data backup...