Cloud Providers

Where Does Alphabet Stand in the Cloud?

Grazed from MarketRealist. Author: Naomi Gray.

Alphabet (GOOGL) has long been viewed as a cloud computing underdog alongside Oracle (ORCL) and International Business Machines (IBM). Let’s see if anything has changed The chart below shows the leading cloud vendors by market share, as estimated by Synergy Research Group.

Although Alphabet still declines to break out its Google Cloud revenues, the company hinted in its 4Q16 earnings report that it’s rapidly gaining ground in the cloud space. The tech giant’s nonadvertising revenues come from sources such as cloud, app, and hardware sales. These revenues increased 62% YoY (year-over-year) to $3.4 billion in 4Q16, a record for the segment...

Google's Biggest Cloud Customer Just Signed a $1 Billion Deal With Amazon

Grazed from MotleyFool. Author: Adam Levy.

It didn't take long for Google's biggest cloud customer to split its allegiances. Just a week after Snap (NYSE:SNAP) announced it signed a $2 billion five-year contract with the Alphabet (NASDAQ:GOOG) (NASDAQ:GOOGL) company, it signed a $1 billion contract with Google's biggest cloud competitor -- Amazon (NASDAQ:AMZN).

Snap will continue to use Google Cloud for the core Snapchat functionality. The Amazon Web Services contract is for "redundant infrastructure support of our business operations," according to Snap's amended S-1 filing. The new filing also revealed Snap has been using Amazon for nearly a year, so not much will change in the near term...

Microsoft announces Azure Service Bus Messaging for improved public cloud infrastructure

Grazed from WWPI. Author: Anna Ribeiro.

Microsoft released this week its Azure Service Bus Messaging with deep feature set available anywhere in public cloud infrastructure. The Azure Service Bus broker infrastructure, available in all global Azure regions and the Azure Government cloud, processes nearly 500 Billion message transactions per month. Each cluster in these regions is backed by as many as hundreds of compute cores, terabytes of memory, and Petabytes of backing storage capacity, exceeding the cluster deployment scale of any commercial or open source broker.

The Azure Premium Messaging tier provides performance predictability and further enhanced reliability by reserving processing resources on a per customer basis inside an environment that provides all the management and cost advantages of cloud scale. As a transactional broker that builds on the ISO/IEC standard AMQP 1.0 protocol, Service Bus provides a basis for commercial and financial workloads...

Microsoft drops a pay-as-you-go Azure cloud option

Grazed from ITWorld. Author: Paul Krill.

Microsoft is shifting its licensing for its Azure cloud service, eliminating the pay-as-you-go option for new Azure customers using MPSA (Microsoft Products and Services Agreement) as of Feb. 1. Instead, they will be steered toward the company's CSP (Cloud Solution Provider) program.

Geared to organizations with at least 250 users, MPSA is Microsoft's simplified agreement consolidating purchase of cloud services and software. The move detailed today follows on Microsoft's decision to not proceed with its proposed Enterprise Advantage program, which was meant to allow customers to buy organization-wide on the MPSA...

The Cloud in 2017: Seven key trends, from AWS and Azure to voice services and machine learning

Grazed from GeekWire. Author: Dan Richman.

Here’s a no-brainer: 2017 will be a big year for the cloud. Cloud computing is an innovation rivaling the advent of client-server, the PC or the internet, and it’s going to enjoy continued vigorous growth in the new year. But private data centers aren’t going away. Though the essential balance of power within the public-cloud world won’t change much, competition may favor companies that best serve the organizations straddling private data centers and the public cloud — which is to say, most of them. Here are some of the key cloud trends to watch this year:

Revenue will rise sharply for the big public-cloud providers.

Forrester is predicting that revenue from public-cloud services, combined with software as a service, will grow at a compounded annual rate of 22 percent between 2015 and 2020, reaching $236 billion. VC firm North Bridge estimated that public-cloud spending alone will grow to $522 billion in 2026, from $75 billion in 2015, a compound annual growth rate of 19 percent...

Cloud Computing: IBM Watson Will Run On IBM and IBM Alone

Grazed from Fortune. Author: Barb Darrow.

You’ve got to give UBS analyst Steven Milunovich major props. During IBM’s earnings call on Monday, he asked whether IBM Watson, the company’s golden child, will run on rival Amazon Web Services—and he was promptly shot down. “No. Watson runs on our cloud, and our technology will run on IBM’s cloud,” IBM chief financial officer Martin Schroeter responded tersely.

Milunovich’s question wasn’t stupid. Just last week, VMware VMW -0.15% , another big Amazon AMZN -0.18% rival, said that its bread-and-butter VMware software will run on AWS, starting next year. Indeed, it seems that most of the world’s most important business software including SAP’s SAP 1.85% HANA databases as well as databases from Oracle ORCL -0.31% and Microsoft MSFT -0.35% , run on AWS...

Microsoft signs Adobe for Azure cloud computing services

Grazed from EconomicTimes. Author: Editorial Staff.

Tech giants Microsoft and Adobe today announced a major partnership to promote the use of each other's cloud-computing tools among their mutual customers. Satya Nadella, Microsoft's chief executive, called the deal a "massive mileston," in an appearance here with Shantanu Narayen, his Adobe counterpart.

The deal follows a pact last year that linked some Adobe products to Microsoft's customer relationship management tools. Cloud-computing, a growing business in which companies increasingly turn to rented, web-based infrastructure to run their software instead of their own back room servers, has a been a showcase of Microsoft's newfound willingness to partner with erstwhile competitors...

How DISA shifted from exclusive cloud provider to facilitator

Grazed from FederalNewsRadio. Author: Editorial Staff.

For nearly 10 years, the Defense Information Systems Agency has been working to provide secure cloud computing to DoD agencies. No longer the exclusive cloud provider itself, DISA now helps agencies use commercial providers in a secure way. Nowadays, the effort centers on applications, if they’re ready for cloud hosting and the best way to go about it. John Hale, the cloud portfolio manager at DISA, explains more on Pentagon Solutions.

It’s no secret that the Pentagon’s wartime budget is now funding a lot of day-to-day requirements, but DoD accounting systems can’t tell how much. New estimates from Government Accountability Office says DoD has routinely dipped into its overseas contingency operations account to fund “enduring” requirements since 2009, but there’s no way to tell which account ultimately funded any particular expense, making it very difficult for Congress to oversee DoD’s operations and maintenance accounts. Andrew Van Ah is GAO’s acting director for Defense Capabilities and Management. He spoke with Federal News Radio’s Jared Serbu about the O&M accounting problem.

Read more from the source @ http://federalnewsradio.com/pentagon-solutions/2016/08/disa-shifted-exclusive-cloud-provider-facilitator/

The man who put Amazon on cloud nine

Grazed from ForbesIndia. Author: Harichandan Arakali.

Andy Jassy, CEO of Amazon Web Services (AWS), has visited India over a dozen times by his own reckoning. His visits, though, are not as sonorous as his boss Jeff Bezos’s. Recall how the founder and CEO of ecommerce behemoth Amazon Inc had put on a shiny bandhgala and posed for photographs, which went viral on social media, leaning out of a truck’s cabin in Bengaluru in September 2014.

Despite Jassy’s lower-pitched demeanour—he prefers a simple business suit and uses a BlackBerry Classic—he has been garnering customer after customer in the country for AWS, Amazon’s cloud computing unit, which has achieved a revenue run rate of $10 billion (around Rs 67,000 crore) globally. The unit, set up in 2006, currently garners about 15 percent of Seattle-based Amazon’s overall revenues but nearly half the company’s operating income...

Read more from the source @ http://forbesindia.com/article/work-in-progress/the-man-who-put-amazon-on-cloud-nine/44009/1#ixzz4GwMM3vOt

Cloud Computing: Why Microsoft Azure Is King of the Hill

Grazed from CloudExpo. Author: John Basso.

As I wrote earlier this year over at InfoWorld, Microsoft took another step toward being king of the cloud hill when it announced in January that it was releasing its Azure stack to the public. There are many technical reasons why this is cool, but more importantly, it's the psychological advantage this gives Microsoft.

Google has always had the ability for developers using its stack to develop locally on the same tools that run in Google App Engine. It recently forked its environments, so now the local and cloud environments are slightly different for some of the configurations -- I can't tell you how many nights I have lost sleep because of environments being slightly different! Development and hosting are two completely different things. What Microsoft did is one-upped Google and Amazon...