Cloud Providers

Is Amazon’s cloud service too big to fail?

Grazed from FnLondon. Author: Yolanda Bobeldijk.

Gavin Jackson, head of Europe, the Middle East and Africa at Amazon Web Services, loves to talk about snowballs. Not the lumps of mush and ice that children chuck at each other, but Amazon’s portable information storage devices, big grey suitcases that hold huge amounts of data.

When clients such as banks sign on with Amazon Web Services, the ecommerce juggernaut’s cloud-computing service, they upload encrypted data from their old legacy IT systems into the snowball, or the larger-capacity snowball edge. These are then shipped to an Amazon data centre where the data is transferred into the AWS cloud...

Cloud Computing: AWS, Azure, and the state of play right now

Grazed from CloudTech. Author: James Bourne.

A few headlines in the tech and business press over recent months have attempted to shed light on Microsoft Azure, Amazon Web Services (AWS), and the public cloud. As reported by The Street last week, Brent Bracelin, senior research analyst at Pacific Crest, wrote: “We estimate that in the second half of this year, Microsoft’s Commercial Cloud segment could surpass Amazon Web Services in absolute revenue, becoming the largest public cloud platform for the first time in 10 years and firmly marking its transition from cloud laggard to cloud leader.”

Later that week, as reported by Business Insider, Deutsche Bank sounded a cautious note towards AWS, moving its price target down from $1,150 to $1,135. While noting the bank remains generally bullish towards AWS, criticism came from a ‘first-ever downtick from partners around the pace of large European enterprise cloud migrations.’...

Read more from the source @ https://www.cloudcomputing-news.net/news/2017/jul/24/aws-azure-and-state-play-right-now/

One More Reason Why AWS is Tough for Microsoft and Google to Beat in Cloud Computing

Grazed from 1RedDrop. Author: Shankar Narayanan.

Vision Mobile’s 12th Developer Economics Global Survey, which reached out to more than 21,200 developers across 160 countries, revealed many developer trends in the cloud segment, and how developers around the world are utilizing top cloud service providers such as Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud Platform.

As expected, Amazon Web Services is the most popular cloud service provider, running away with medium to large enterprises segment, while holding a marginal lead with small companies with 1-5 employees. In that segment Amazon has a 15% share, with Microsoft holding 12% and Google holding an 11% share...

Read more from the source @ http://1reddrop.com/2017/04/02/aws-tough-microsoft-google-beat-cloud-computing/

Which cloud will give you the biggest bang for the buck?

Grazed from ZDNet. Author: Steven J.Vaughn-Nichols.

After Amazon Web Services' (AWS) Northern Virginia datacenter went casters up, you might think about switching your Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud provider. If that's the case, Cloud Spectator has benchmarked 10 of the biggest public cloud Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) providers based on price and value.

Cloud Spectator tested 10 of the largest, most well-known public cloud providers with North American datacenters. These were: 1&1, AWS, Microsoft Azure, CenturyLink, DigitalOcean, Dimension Data, Google Cloud Platform, OVH, Rackspace, and IBM/Softlayer, aka Bluemix. They examined the performance of vCPU, memory, and block storage along with cost. This gives users the clouds' CloudSpecs Score...

Read more from the source @ http://www.zdnet.com/article/which-cloud-will-give-you-the-biggest-bang-for-the-buck/

Where Does Alphabet Stand in the Cloud?

Grazed from MarketRealist. Author: Naomi Gray.

Alphabet (GOOGL) has long been viewed as a cloud computing underdog alongside Oracle (ORCL) and International Business Machines (IBM). Let’s see if anything has changed The chart below shows the leading cloud vendors by market share, as estimated by Synergy Research Group.

Although Alphabet still declines to break out its Google Cloud revenues, the company hinted in its 4Q16 earnings report that it’s rapidly gaining ground in the cloud space. The tech giant’s nonadvertising revenues come from sources such as cloud, app, and hardware sales. These revenues increased 62% YoY (year-over-year) to $3.4 billion in 4Q16, a record for the segment...

Google's Biggest Cloud Customer Just Signed a $1 Billion Deal With Amazon

Grazed from MotleyFool. Author: Adam Levy.

It didn't take long for Google's biggest cloud customer to split its allegiances. Just a week after Snap (NYSE:SNAP) announced it signed a $2 billion five-year contract with the Alphabet (NASDAQ:GOOG) (NASDAQ:GOOGL) company, it signed a $1 billion contract with Google's biggest cloud competitor -- Amazon (NASDAQ:AMZN).

Snap will continue to use Google Cloud for the core Snapchat functionality. The Amazon Web Services contract is for "redundant infrastructure support of our business operations," according to Snap's amended S-1 filing. The new filing also revealed Snap has been using Amazon for nearly a year, so not much will change in the near term...

Microsoft announces Azure Service Bus Messaging for improved public cloud infrastructure

Grazed from WWPI. Author: Anna Ribeiro.

Microsoft released this week its Azure Service Bus Messaging with deep feature set available anywhere in public cloud infrastructure. The Azure Service Bus broker infrastructure, available in all global Azure regions and the Azure Government cloud, processes nearly 500 Billion message transactions per month. Each cluster in these regions is backed by as many as hundreds of compute cores, terabytes of memory, and Petabytes of backing storage capacity, exceeding the cluster deployment scale of any commercial or open source broker.

The Azure Premium Messaging tier provides performance predictability and further enhanced reliability by reserving processing resources on a per customer basis inside an environment that provides all the management and cost advantages of cloud scale. As a transactional broker that builds on the ISO/IEC standard AMQP 1.0 protocol, Service Bus provides a basis for commercial and financial workloads...

Microsoft drops a pay-as-you-go Azure cloud option

Grazed from ITWorld. Author: Paul Krill.

Microsoft is shifting its licensing for its Azure cloud service, eliminating the pay-as-you-go option for new Azure customers using MPSA (Microsoft Products and Services Agreement) as of Feb. 1. Instead, they will be steered toward the company's CSP (Cloud Solution Provider) program.

Geared to organizations with at least 250 users, MPSA is Microsoft's simplified agreement consolidating purchase of cloud services and software. The move detailed today follows on Microsoft's decision to not proceed with its proposed Enterprise Advantage program, which was meant to allow customers to buy organization-wide on the MPSA...

The Cloud in 2017: Seven key trends, from AWS and Azure to voice services and machine learning

Grazed from GeekWire. Author: Dan Richman.

Here’s a no-brainer: 2017 will be a big year for the cloud. Cloud computing is an innovation rivaling the advent of client-server, the PC or the internet, and it’s going to enjoy continued vigorous growth in the new year. But private data centers aren’t going away. Though the essential balance of power within the public-cloud world won’t change much, competition may favor companies that best serve the organizations straddling private data centers and the public cloud — which is to say, most of them. Here are some of the key cloud trends to watch this year:

Revenue will rise sharply for the big public-cloud providers.

Forrester is predicting that revenue from public-cloud services, combined with software as a service, will grow at a compounded annual rate of 22 percent between 2015 and 2020, reaching $236 billion. VC firm North Bridge estimated that public-cloud spending alone will grow to $522 billion in 2026, from $75 billion in 2015, a compound annual growth rate of 19 percent...

Cloud Computing: IBM Watson Will Run On IBM and IBM Alone

Grazed from Fortune. Author: Barb Darrow.

You’ve got to give UBS analyst Steven Milunovich major props. During IBM’s earnings call on Monday, he asked whether IBM Watson, the company’s golden child, will run on rival Amazon Web Services—and he was promptly shot down. “No. Watson runs on our cloud, and our technology will run on IBM’s cloud,” IBM chief financial officer Martin Schroeter responded tersely.

Milunovich’s question wasn’t stupid. Just last week, VMware VMW -0.15% , another big Amazon AMZN -0.18% rival, said that its bread-and-butter VMware software will run on AWS, starting next year. Indeed, it seems that most of the world’s most important business software including SAP’s SAP 1.85% HANA databases as well as databases from Oracle ORCL -0.31% and Microsoft MSFT -0.35% , run on AWS...