Cloud Companies

Former head of Intel Capital to lead $150mn European cloud fund

Grazed from TheStack. Author: Alice MacGregor.

London-based fund manager C5 Capital is aiming to raise a $150 million (approx. £114 million) fund to tap into the growing cloud computing sector after appointing the former European head of Intel Capital, Marcos Battisti. Battisti will join the firm this September to manage one of the largest funds of its kind in Europe.

The investment will target next-stage development businesses operating in the cloud computing market, and hopes to enable further opportunities for remote processing and storage. The Financial Times expected typical investments to be between $5 million and $15 million. At Intel’s venture capital group in the States, Battisti was involved in investments in companies such as French mobile connectivity company Sigfox, and Israeli semiconductor designer Anobit – which was bought by Apple in 2012...

Cloud Computing: Veritas Ups Resiliency Factor In Datacenter Space Race

Grazed from Forbes. Author: Adrian Bridgwater.

There is something of a space race on in the datacenter market. Hardware vendors now think they are software vendors. Well-known ex-PC manufactures now bill themselves as Software Defined DataCenter (SDDC) specialists — and cloud computing specialists are busy reshaping their offerings as it turns out that ultra-hybrid multi-cloud multi-vendor cross-platform is the only way to run a cloud.

There is no real cloud

It’s all change and some say that there is no real ‘Internet’ or ‘cloud computing’ anyway. The web is in fact a distributed hypermedia system of data nodes interrelated via defined interaction criteria that live in datacenters. The cloud is just a collection of various data nodes in that same system with bits of software management intelligence sprinkled around...

Read more from the source @ http://www.forbes.com/sites/adrianbridgwater/2016/08/26/veritas-ups-resiliency-factor-in-datacenter-space-race/#7f15d4b43745

Virtustream and Iron Mountain Join Forces to Build Cloud Platform for Enterprise Data Management

Grazed from BusinessWire. Author: PR Announcement.

Virtustream, the enterprise-class cloud services and software provider and an EMC Federation Company, today announced that Iron Mountain Incorporated (NYSE:IRM), the global leader in storage and information management services, has selected Virtustream® xStream® and Virtustream Viewtrust® software to orchestrate, automate and secure cloud storage services for Iron Mountain’s cloud-based service offerings.

“Changes in technology and business processes are challenging the most progressive companies to adopt new strategies to handle the resulting explosion of high value data,” said Eileen Sweeney, senior vice president and general manager for Data Management at Iron Mountain. “To enable our customers to adapt their data management processes to these challenges, we are embracing technology and offering clients a hybrid approach to manage all types of data, through various stages of the data lifecycle...

Cloud Computing: Cray’s latest supercomputer runs OpenStack and open source big data tools

Grazed from TechCrunch. Author: Ron Miller.

Cray has always been associated with speed and power and its latest computing beast called the Cray Urika-GX system has been designed specifically for big data workloads. What’s more, it runs on OpenStack, the open source cloud platform and supports open source big data processing tools like Hadoop and Spark.

Cray recognizes that the computing world had evolved since Seymour Cray launched the company back in the early 1970s. While the computers they are creating remain technology performance powerhouses, they are competing in an entirely different landscape that includes cloud computing where companies can get as many computing resources as they need and pay by the sip (or the gulp in the case of Cray-style processing)...

Cloud Computing: Intel rolls out silicon photonics for data centers

Grazed from Optics.org. Author: Editorial Staff.

Intel says it has started shipping silicon photonics products based around a hybrid indium phosphide/silicon laser, and says that it expects the technology to eventually feature “everywhere” in data centers. Officially launching the platform at this year’s Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco, Intel’s general manager of data centers Diane Bryant claimed that the Californian chip giant was the only company building its silicon photonics around a laser directly integrated into the material. “We are the first to light up silicon,” she said, adding that products had been shipping since June. “We integrate the laser light-emitting material, which is indium phosphide, onto the silicon and use lithography to define the laser, to align it with precision.”

Cost, reach and density advantage

Bryant says that this yields a cost advantage versus other approaches to silicon photonics, which can involve tricky manual alignment, as well as longer reach and higher density. But she admitted that it had taken Intel a long time – 16 years to be precise – to transfer the technology from its research laboratories and into a full-blown product...

Cloud Computing: AWS and Azure get the highest federal security rating: What happens from here?

Grazed from CloudTech. Author: Rick Delgado.

Cloud services have been able to store customers’ data for many years now, but the number of prospective clients for several vendors has recently dramatically increased. Back in late June, the announcement was made that three vendors had received special certifications from the federal government, allowing them to store sensitive data that the government had on hand.

Two of those providers are among the most popular within the cloud market, Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Microsoft Azure, while the third is CSRA’s ARC-P IaaS, a vendor that might not be as universally known as the others but still carries enough weight for those in the know. The news was certainly noteworthy for those providers, but it also has tremendous implications for federal agencies as well as the cloud market as a whole...

Why Cloud Player Datapipe Is Acquiring This U.K. Startup

Grazed from Fortune. Author: Barb Darrow.

Datapipe, which over the past three years has been busy snapping up cloud computing properties, is at it again: This time out, it is buying Adapt, a U.K.-based company that helps customers run Amazon Web Services. Terms were not disclosed. Adapt is what is called a “managed services provider,” or MSP, which means it offers an array of technology services in a way that is theoretically easy for the business customer to use.

An MSP is often thought of as a sort of outsourced IT professional. It might run the customer’s email and provide related security and other services, for example in a way so the customer does not have to sweat the details of upgrades and patches etc. The Adapt deal comes about a year after Datapipe bought DualSpark, a company founded by former Amazon AMZN 0.08% personnel to make it easier to move business applications from internal equipment to the AWS cloud, which is a massive array of servers, storage, and networking owned and managed by AWS...

Read more from the source @ http://fortune.com/2016/08/17/datapipe-buys-adapt/

Alibaba’s dominant cloud business could take on Amazon

Grazed from YahooFinance. Author: JP Mangalindan.

Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba (BABA) reported stellar fiscal first-quarter earnings on Thursday propelled by revenues that spiked 59%, surging past Wall Street estimates. And while talk of e-commerce transactions soaring on mobile dominated the announcement, analysts also paid close attention to the company’s cloud computing business, Alibaba Cloud — and for good reason.

Founded in 2009, Alibaba Cloud has evolved into China’s dominant cloud computing services provider, offering clients including Dutch electronics giant Philips, Schneider Electric and marketing platform Blogmint a wide range of storage, security, and database management options. For its fiscal first quarter, the company reported Alibaba Cloud revenues swelled 156% year-over-year to $188 million with 577,000 paid users...

Cloud Computing: Hewlett Packard Enterprise Just Spent Millions on This Supercomputer Maker

Grazed from Fortune. Author: Jonathan Vanian.

It’s all about the data. Hewlett Packard Enterprise isn’t slimming today. The business technology giant said Thursday that it will buy computing hardware maker SGI for roughly $275 million. HPE said the deal should close in the first quarter of its fiscal 2017 as long as regulators approve it.

For the past several months, HPE has been slicing off chunks of its business it no longer wants, like a majority stake in the Indian outsourcing subsidiary Mphasis it sold for $825 million in April, and an IT services business group it spun out and merged with Computer Sciences in May to form a new joint venture...

Cloud Computing: How Amazon is disrupting a $34bn database market

Grazed from CloudTech. Author: Editorial Staff.

When Amazon launched Aurora in 2014, it was presented as a clear challenge to giants in the $34 billion database market. Today it is Amazon’s fastest-growing product and has already surpassed the growth of Amazon Redshift, which is saying something. Customers of the service are among Amazon’s largest and loudest advocates.

Since the start of 2016, roughly 7,000 databases have been migrated to AWS Aurora — and the rate of adoption has tripled since March 2016. Why is Aurora gaining popularity? As we have come to expect from Amazon, Aurora provides enterprises with the performance and reliability of a commercial product at a fraction of the cost of Oracle or IBM...