Cloud Computing

How the Cloud Improves Communication Within Global Businesses

Article Written by Avery Phillips

For global businesses, the languages, currencies, cultures, and business practices they need to navigate will vary greatly on a daily basis, depending on where their employees are based. Of course, clear and consistent communication is key for success in such a widespread organization. By offering unified systems that are highly accessible to employees around the world, cloud computing provides a number of solutions to common communication issues. Here are a few major examples of how cloud computing improves communication within global businesses.

Payroll

For companies that operate on a global scale, payroll can be a pain to keep up with. Payroll and tax laws differ greatly between countries depending on local and national regulations. Along with balancing these expectations, companies also have to meet the financial requirements of the banking systems they use. In such complex circumstances, things can easily get out of hand, resulting in hefty fines and penalties. However, the cloud allows companies to centralize their efforts to meet these regulations and track other payroll issues, all in one place. This makes it much easier for global businesses to monitor and maintain compliance with the variety of tax laws and payroll regulations in different countries.

Cloud Computing: Why Oracle needs to push digital hard

Grazed from LiveMint. Author: Editorial Staff.

US-based Oracle Corp. is sharpening focus on its own digital transformation as well as that of its customers to stay competitive in a world where companies are increasingly grappling with newer business models, and demanding solutions that require expertise in the Internet of Things (IoT) and Artificial Intelligence (AI), besides cloud computing and big data analytics.

Consider cloud computing—a concept that Larry Ellison, now executive chairman and chief technology officer of Oracle, had scoffed at nearly a decade back. At the September 2016 Open World event in San Francisco, however, Ellison insisted, “We are in the middle of a generational change as computing moves from on-premise and lots and lots of data centres and lots of companies in the world to a smaller number of super data centres called clouds.”...

Read more from the source @ http://www.livemint.com/Technology/xAp1mI7FinypauAYo4KJ0K/Why-Oracle-needs-to-push-digital-hard.html

Cloud Computing: Light, not bytes - The evolution of the pipeline

Grazed from GameIndustry. Author: Will Freeman.

Over in the consumer space, the notion of stuffing a hard drive with files has become rather antiquated. By default, music, movies and games are streamed in many homes, while lay-software is increasingly bearing the burden of its gradual superseding by offerings like Google Docs.

And yet, at many different games developers where a flag is confidently staked in the cutting edge, development pipelines are still housed in on-premise hardware, stitched together from middleware, software and other technologies. They thunder away, handling files and assets while pushing data to workstations, at a time where even the once-futuristic gigabyte is now seen as trivial volume of data...

Read more from the source @ http://www.gamesindustry.biz/articles/2017-06-27-light-not-bytes-the-evolution-of-the-pipeline

Amazon hits back after Walmart tells suppliers to stop using its cloud services

Grazed from TheDrum. Author: Tony Connelly.

The fallout follows on from a report in the Wall Street journal, which revealed the US retail chain had told the technology companies it works with to stop using Amazon cloud web services and move to competitors instead. Amazon has become a dominant player in cloud-based storage and computing power with its Amazon Web Services program.

Known as AWS, it has a 44% share of the market, according to Synergy Research Group, and its clients include Netflix, Airbnb, General Electric and the CIA. In April the company reported its cloud services platform had generated $3.7bn in sales over the previous three months. Now with Walmart aggressively investing in e-commerce, it is trying to undermine its rival's dominance in the space...

Read more from the source @ http://www.thedrum.com/news/2017/06/25/amazon-hits-back-after-walmart-tells-suppliers-stop-using-its-cloud-services

Cloud Computing Protest Offers Lessons For Buyers & Suppliers

Grazed from PublicSpendingForum. Author: Frank McNally.

A recent protest decision from the Government Accountability Office (GAO) provides several important lessons for procurement professionals who are buying cloud-enabled services as well as vendors hoping to sell them. Let's dive in! Red River Computing Company protested the Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) request for quotations (RFQ) for agency-wide enterprise computing services and cloud computing services.

Red River challenged both the technical and price evaluation, asserting that DHS's best-value determination was flawed. GAO denied Red River's challenge of the technical evaluation but sustained its challenge of the price evaluation. Each decision is instructive, so let's take a closer look...

How to successfully move your business into the cloud

There are many companies that have started to see the benefits of running their business entirely in the cloud. You can access documents and other data wherever you are, and all your employees can keep in touch with you and one anther far easier. Starting to transfer your business to the cloud might sound daunting at first, but here are some useful steps to help make the transformation as smooth as possible.

Why do you want to change?

The above question can be a major issue that some of your employees or clients might ask you, a there has to be a good reason why you want to move your business to the cloud. Maybe, you are thinking of upgrading your current computer hardware or software, or perhaps you are moving to new premises.

7 Ways Cloud Computing is Transforming Manufacturing as We Know It

Manufacturers are moving to cloud-based solutions because of the benefits of the technology. Because of the cloud, manufacturers now store vast amounts of data online and access it in real-time. This increases not only their manufacturing efficiency, but also their profitability. And, thanks to the cloud, small firms with little in the way of resources can now scale up and down without hassle. For the first time, they can compete better in the global market. Now, let us look at more ways in which cloud computing is transforming manufacturing,

1) Wearable Devices

Wearable devices come in many forms and do many things. Fitness trackers, smart watches, head-mounted displays, smart jewelry, and smart clothing are changing both the quality of our lives and how we access information. Other devices, known as implantables, are implanted under the skin to treat heart conditions. Because of this flexibility, wearable devices have caught the eye of manufacturers. When used with the cloud, such devices could transform manufacturing as we know it.

Take Google Glass, for instance. This pair of glasses can allow workers to access critical data without leaving their stations. It can also replace scanners and barcode readers by collecting and sending data to servers and cloud-based applications. Employees can then use the time they would have otherwise spent doing data collection on something else, thereby increasing their productivity. Smart devices also increase safety in the workplace. They warn drivers, especially those driving heavy machinery when colleagues are in the drivers' blind spot.

Should you move your small business to cloud?



Article Written by Mike Thatcher

Cloud computing can bring small businesses to big changes. And, that's exactly what it's supposed to do. 

The first ones to realize that these big changes are taking place at the very moment while we are talking about it are both small-business owners from tech startups to local crafts shops.

Around 37% of US small businesses have fully transferred to the cloud, and this percentage is about to grow, naturally. 

Make sense of edge computing vs. cloud computing

Grazed from InfoWorld. Author: David Linthicum.

The internet of things is real, and it’s a real part of the cloud. A key challenge is how you can get data processed from so many devices. Cisco Systems predicts that cloud traffic is likely to rise nearly fourfold by 2020, increasing 3.9 zettabytes (ZB) per year in 2015 (the latest full year for which data is available) to 14.1ZB per year by 2020.

As a result, we could have the cloud computing perfect storm from the growth of IoT. After all, IoT is about processing device-generated data that is meaningful, and cloud computing is about using data from centralized computing and storage. Growth rates of both can easily become unmanageable. So what do we do? The answer is something called “edge computing.”...

Cloud Computing: Under Pressure, IT May Need to Fail Fast With Some Projects

Grazed from InformationWeek. Author: Charles Babcock.

It used to be that every IT technology project needed to be a business -- to have a business justification. Now, every new business project "needs to be a technology," noted Mark Tonsetic, analyst with the CEB unit of Gartner. "Digital is the new battleground" in the evolution of the modern enterprise, he said, and even the CEO wants a story to tell Wall Street about how his company is going digital. For optimists, that means new revenue opportunities and short time to market for new products. For pessimists, it means the company may not stave off disruption but at least it's making a move to avoid it.

Tonsectic described how CIOs and IT directors might navigate these newly choppy and hazardous waters in a session at Interop ITX on May 19, How The Cloud Is Changing IT Investment Plans. The goal isn't to make just the right investment in cloud. It’s to fit cloud into an IT ecosystem that has all the right components needed by the transforming company, he said...