VPC

AWS Announces AWS PrivateLink

Grazed from Amazon AWS

Today at AWS re:Invent, Amazon Web Services, Inc. (AWS), announced that customers can now use AWS PrivateLink to access third-party SaaS applications from their Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) without exposing their VPC to the public Internet. Customers can also use AWS PrivateLink to connect services across different accounts and VPCs within their own organizations, significantly simplifying their internal network architecture. To get started with AWS PrivateLink visit: https://aws.amazon.com/vpc/details/.

Since the introduction of Amazon VPC in 2009, AWS customers have been able to define and control private, secure networks without having to invest in and manage a VPN infrastructure. The vast majority of Amazon EC2 instances now run in Amazon VPCs, and many customers rely on the ability to limit access to their VPC from the Internet as a critical component of their security. However, this presents a challenge when using third-party SaaS applications, as customers often have to make a choice between allowing Internet access from their VPC in order to access these SaaS applications, or not using them at all. With AWS PrivateLink, customers can now connect their VPCs to third-party services in a secure and scalable manner. Earlier this month, AWS introduced the ability for customers to access AWS services over AWS PrivateLink. Now, AWS has extended AWS PrivateLink to support non-AWS services so that customers no longer have to choose between using a third-party SaaS offering or exposing their critical data to the Internet. Traffic between a customer's VPC and a AWS PrivateLink-powered service stays within the AWS network and doesn't traverse the Internet, reducing threat vectors such as "brute force" and distributed-denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks. Services supported on AWS PrivateLink are delivered using private IP connectivity and security groups, and function like services that are hosted directly on a customer's private network.

Cloud Computing: Pertino Simplifies Extending VPCs Across WANs and Between Providers

Grazed from Pertino. Author: Editorial Staff.

Pertino, a company reinventing networking for the cloud era, today announced a modern approach to WAN-based VPC using its Cloud Network Engine service. As cloud adoption increases, so does the demand for extending VPC over the WAN to connect public cloud servers across different regions and providers and with remote servers and users. Today's WAN-based VPC solutions are very complicated and inflexible, creating significant friction with the dynamic and elastic cloud infrastructures they connect. The Pertino Cloud Network Engine enables IT and DevOps professionals to build secure, cloud-based VPCs in minuteswithout configuration or hardware that work anywhere with any public cloud provider.

According to IDC, worldwide spending on Hosted Private Cloud services is set to surpass $24 billion in 2016, and analysts "anticipate that virtual private cloud will be the predominant operational model for companies wanting to take advantage of the speed and lower capital costs associated with cloud computing."...

5 Major Types of Cloud Infrastructure Options

Grazed from Cloud Tweaks.  Author: Balaji Viswanathan.

Cloud computing is not an all-or-nothing option. In the past decade, the industry has matured to a point where there are almost a dozen different options to move your data and processes to the cloud. In this post, we will cover the five major options and will talk about the enterprises for whom each of these options are best suited for.

Virtual machines

This is the most common form of cloud setup, where third party service providers give you shared computing resource in their datacenter for an hourly fee. The physical servers at the data center are turned into many virtual server instances, each of which can be run by a different enterprise. Virtual machines can provide you the best utilization of resources by keeping the machines from going idle. This setup is suited for workloads that are highly varying (most websites, blogs) and for smaller enterprises that do not need the flexibility and control of a private cloud. It is very cost-effective, though it might not be suited for high performance computing...