Technology Adoption

Cloud adoption could save two mega tonnes of carbon in China

Grazed from iHotDesk. Author: Editorial Staff.

Because of its massive manufacturing output, China is amongst the biggest polluters in the world. But according to a new report it could clean up its act with cloud computing. A study conducted by Global e-Sustainability Initiative (GeSI) found that use of cloud computing services in the country could reduce its annual greenhouse gas emission by almost two mega tonnes.

That is the equivalent of taking more than 700,000 cars off the road which would save more than 900 million Yuan (approx. £89.9 million) in energy costs. The study, which is entitled ‘The Enabling Technologies of a Low-Carbon Economy- a Focus on Cloud Computing’ looked into how the cloud could help to reduce CO2 emissions in Canada, Brazil and seven European nations as well as in China...

CISA Forms Taiwan Delegation to Demo Latest Cloud Computing Achievements in Montreal, Canada

Grazed from PRNewsWire. Author: PR Announcement.

Information Service Industry Association of Chinese Taipei (CISA) today forms a Taiwan Delegation -- a group of approx. 40 members with the majority coming from renowned Taiwan ICT companies and associations including telecom, R&D, software & hardware in cloud computing areas, all appearing in the 2012 WCIT Show held in Montreal, Canada. The Taiwan delegation will showcase its latest Cloud Computing technologies in the Taiwan Pavilion booth during the 3-day show, followed with a workshop presentation on Cloud Computing to report achievements and future development in Taiwan.

Kicking off with a special "CLOUD" opening ceremony and cocktail reception on Day 1 of the 2012 WCIT show, Taiwan delegates will showcase the latest cloud computing products in the Taiwan Pavilion at Montreal. Ming-Ji Wu, chief representative of the delegation, who is also Deputy Minister of Council for Economic Planning and Development, leads the delegation and to demonstrate Taiwan cloud computing achievements at the event...

Reasons Why Cloud Computing Is A Hot Start-up Area

Grazed from CloudTweaks. Author: Gregory Musungu.

The cloud computing business model has had a phenomenal adoption in the last decade. It scales business, private, and public operations in a way that lowers costs, takes advantage of new technology, and boosts efficiency with minimal infrastructural engagements. And because it’s been the center of many debates surrounding business operations, cloud computing sector has been a beehive of activities. In the past few months, it has suddenly become a hot start-up area, attracting more and more interest. There are a number of possible reasons for this.

1. Closing knowledge gap about the cloud

According to a survey carried out and published by the Business Insider in late 2011, close to 50 percent of all Americans were not aware of what the cloud was. When the infograph came in, it worried stakeholders in the industry and they seem to have acted upon it. Recently, there has been marked evidence of a reducing knowledge gap in the previously quiet cloud sphere. People are becoming aware of the cloud and what it can do for start-ups and innovative businesses...

IDC: Removing barriers to cloud computing could double EU spending by 2020

Grazed from FierceEnterpriseCommunications. Author: Fred Donovon.

Removing barriers to cloud computing could more than double spending on cloud services in Europe, from €35.2 billion currently to €77.8 billion by 2020, according to a study by IDC on behalf of the European Union (EU).

IDC identified five main barriers to cloud adoption in the EU:

  • uncertainty about legal jurisdiction and location of data in the cloud
  • concern about the level of cloud security and assessing the trustworthiness of suppliers
  • uncertainty about the business case of adopting the cloud model
  • fear of lock-in with proprietary systems
  • insufficient local support...

Healthcare Industry to Spend Upwards of $5B on Cloud Solutions by 2017

Grazed from HealthTech Zone. Author: Editorial Staff.

A recent report finds that the fun is just beginning for healthcare in the cloud.

The cloud computing market is poised to expand by an estimated 20.5 percent over the next five years to become a $5.4 billion market by 2017, according to “Healthcare Cloud Computing Market – Global Trends, Challenges, Opportunities & Forecasts.” Healthcare spending on the cloud hovers around $1.8 billion as of 2011 despite market penetration of only four percent.

“The market is witnessing a surge in the adoption of technology, and cloud computing is expected to bring about a revolution in the healthcare IT market,” MarketsandMarkets said in the report. It noted that healthcare organizations (HCOs) are expected to deliver more with fewer resources, which is helping to fuel the growth in cloud usage...

Cloud Computing: Wither the hard drive? Facebook's secret plans for flash memory

Grazed from GigaOM. Author: Stacey Higginbotham.

Facebook is planning to rely more on flash drives in places where most companies have used spinning disk, and based on conversations with sources and hints from Facebook, I think one of those places will be in Facebook’s cold-storage photo facility it’s building in Oregon.

Facebook has flash memory on the brain. The social network, which has helped rethink server design for its operations and is designing a new type of infrastructure from the ground up for storing infrequently accessed photos, is thinking about “more use cases for flash,” said Jay Parikh, vice president of engineering and infrastructure...

Mobility, cloud, big data challenge CIOs

Grazed from ITWeb. Author: Admire Moyo.

Though there are many trends percolating through the local IT space, enterprise mobility, cloud computing and big data are presenting CIOs with the biggest challenges. So says Michael Vincent, director for innovation and strategy at Deloitte Consulting, who is also a keynote speaker at the upcoming CSSA President’s Awards. Vincent believes each of these trends will receive critical importance on the CIO’s radar in the coming 12 to 18 months.

Mobile strategy

Regarding enterprise mobility, Vincent says large enterprises have moved rapidly in adopting the revolutionary potential of mobile apps to both enable and transform business processes. He explains that as CIOs gain experience in the design and engineering of good mobile apps, there tends to be an explosive growth in the number of apps in and around the enterprise...

Cost savings, efficiencies lead IT pros to cloud computing

Grazed from TechTarget. Author: Stephen J. Bigelow.

Few technologies have affected the IT industry as profoundly as cloud computing, which delivers computing as a service or utility. Part of cloud's appeal is clearly financial; it allows organizations to shed at least some of their expensive IT infrastructure and shift computing costs to more manageable operational expenses.

The cloud also eases much of the technological burden involved with IT systems support and maintenance, helping companies focus on the productive business use of their workloads rather than on underlying systems and software. Regardless of the motivation, business owners and data center managers are increasingly turning to cloud for vital computing services. This report examines key findings of a recent TechTarget survey about cloud adoption and services...

Cloud computing creeps into corporations

Grazed from ScrippsNews. Author: Steve Alexander.

Cloud computing -- using remote data centers over the Internet instead of buying computers -- has been quietly creeping into companies under the noses of corporate executives. Departments are using it without permission by putting it on company charge cards, and employees widely use some common cloud applications such as Google Docs or Salesforce.com, said Bill Martorelli, an analyst at Forrester Research in Cambridge, Mass.

"Corporations really need to reconcile themselves to cloud computing," said Martorelli. "But they also have to find the balance between empowerment of employees and corporate control."...

The cloud tiptoes in

Grazed from The Star Tribune. Author: Steve Alexander.

Cloud computing -- using remote data centers over the Internet instead of buying computers -- has been quietly creeping into companies under the noses of corporate executives. Departments are using it without permission by putting it on company charge cards, and employees widely use some common cloud applications such as Google Docs or Salesforce.com, said Bill Martorelli, an analyst at Forrester Research in Cambridge, Mass.

"Corporations really need to reconcile themselves to cloud computing," said Martorelli, who will be the keynote speaker Tuesday at the Enterprise Cloud Summit at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts that's sponsored by Wisconsin-based TDS Telecommunications. "But they also have to find the balance between empowerment of employees and corporate control."...