OpenStack

Understanding OpenStack's Success

Grazed from Linux Journal.  Author: Petros Koutoupis

At the time I got into the data storage industry, I was working with and developing RAID and JBOD (Just a Bunch Of Disks) controllers for 2 Gbit Fibre Channel Storage Area Networks (SAN). This was a time before "The Cloud". Things were different—so were our users. There was comfort in buying from a single source or single vendor. In an ideal world, it should all work together, harmoniously, right? And when things go awry, that single vendor should be able to solve every problem within that entire deployment.

That is why, enterprise companies typically bought from a single storage vendor and invested deeply in them. You either bought HP, Dell, EMC, Sun Microsystems or NetApp, which also was successfully carving a new market in Network Attached Storage (NAS). For example, once an EMC shop, always an EMC shop. Hundreds of thousands to even millions of dollars were spent to ensure that you were enabled for high availability, fault tolerance, training, support and more. Again, through that single vendor.

Containers May Work With, Or In Place Of, Private Cloud

Grazed from InformationWeek.  Author: Charles Babcock

Some investors in private cloud say OpenStack is attractive to them because it can serve as a platform on which to manage containers. Jonathan Bryce, executive director of the Openstack Foundation, made that argument recently and PayPal, Comcast, and other major OpenStack implementers have suggested the same thing.

In support of his position, Bryce referred to the 451 Research report of Jan. 10, OpenStack and Containers: Confusion, Complement and Competition, which cited the efforts within the OpenStack project to accommodate containers and manage them at a large scale. These include the Zun, Magnum and Heat projects within OpenStack for managing containers. OpenStack and Containers is only available behind a 451 Research paywall.
 

New 'Open Source Days' Program Launches as Part of OpenStack Summit in Boston

Grazed from OpenStack

The OpenStack Summit-the must-attend open infrastructure event-will feature a new program called "Open Source Days," happening May 8-11 in Boston at the Hynes Convention Center. Open Source Days bring together adjacent open source communities with the goals to improve collaboration and technical integration throughout the diverse ecosystem of open source projects that OpenStack users rely upon.

Community members from Ceph, Kubernetes, Cloud Foundry, Open vSwitch, OPNFV, OpenSwitch, Ansible, OpenContrail and more will each host their own Open Source Day during the OpenStack Summit. The Open Source Days will essentially be a dedicated content track to present software roadmaps, user stories and important cross-community roundtables.

Google, Harvard, China Mobile to Speak at the OpenStack Summit Boston

Grazed from OpenStack Foundation

Today the OpenStack Foundation announced that Brian Stevens of Google, Mercè Crosas of The Institute for Quantitative Social Science (IQSS) at Harvard University and Junwei Lu of China Mobile are among the speakers committed to the next OpenStack Summit, the must-attend open infrastructure event, taking place May 8-11 at the Hynes Convention Center in Boston. OpenStack users at Bloomberg, eBay and the US Army Cyber School are also among the first round of confirmed speakers. The call for presentations is open through February 6, and the full agenda will be published in March.

More than 6,000 participants from 60+ countries are expected to attend the OpenStack Summit to discuss how open infrastructure is helping companies increase agility and save money as software becomes more strategic to their business. Headline sponsors are Intel, Mirantis, Deutsche Telekom and Red Hat.

Stevens, vice president of cloud platforms at Google, will discuss how open source is the vehicle for hybrid cloud and is also enabling new use cases such as machine learning. Crosas, chief data science and technology officer at Harvard IQSS (Institute for Quantitative and Social Science), will discuss the Cloud Dataverse collaboration with the Massachusetts Open Cloud (MOC) to host datasets, supporting thousands of researchers at more than 500 worldwide institutions using Dataverse, in the MOC's OpenStack cloud.

9 tips to properly configure your OpenStack Instance

Grazed from Red Hat. Author: Marko Myllynen

In OpenStack jargon, an Instance is a Virtual Machine, the guest workload. It boots from an operating system image, and it is configured with a certain amount of CPU, RAM and disk space, amongst other parameters such as networking or security settings.

In this blog post kindly contributed by Marko Myllynen we’ll explore nine configuration and optimization options that will help you achieve the required performance, reliability and security that you need for your workloads.

Application containers 'will overtake OpenStack growth by 2020'

Grazed from CloudPro. Author: Clare Hopping.

The application containers market will be worth $2.7 billion (£2.2 billion) by 2020, according to 451 Research.

Assessing the performance of 125 container vendors, 451 Research found that growth of the container cloud development technology follows the trend of OpenStack, which also became popular fast. However, the analyst firm said the containers sector has the potential to have a much bigger impact than OpenStack, despite pegging the latter technology's value at $5.8 billion (£4.8 billion) by 2020.

Cloud Computing: 7 new guides and tips for OpenStack

Grazed from OpenSource. Author: Jason Baker.

Familiarity with OpenStack is likely to continue to be one of the most in-demand job skills in the new year, both for developers and system administrators. But OpenStack is a huge area, encompassing dozens of individual projects with varying degrees of complexity. Building and keeping up your skills can be a challenge.

Fortunately, there are lots of resources out there to help you learn what you need to know. In addition to the official documentation, numerous training and certification programs, books, and other resources, there are also plenty of community-created tutorials, guides, and how-tos out there created by OpenStack developers and users who wish to share their first-hand knowledge...

SUSE Acquires OpenStack IaaS and Cloud Foundry PaaS Talent and Technology Assets from HPE

Grazed from SUSE

SUSE has entered into an agreement with Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) to acquire technology and talent that will expand SUSE's OpenStack Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) solution and accelerate SUSE's entry into the growing Cloud Foundry Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) market. The acquired OpenStack assets will be integrated into SUSE OpenStack Cloud, and the acquired Cloud Foundry and PaaS assets will enable SUSE to bring to market a certified, enterprise-ready SUSE Cloud Foundry PaaS solution for all customers and partners in the SUSE ecosystem. The agreement includes HPE naming SUSE as its preferred open source partner for Linux, OpenStack and Cloud Foundry solutions. In addition, SUSE has increased engagement with the Cloud Foundry Foundation, becoming a platinum member and taking a seat on the Cloud Foundry Foundation board.

Mirantis moves out of OpenStack BS-as-a-Service market

Grazed from CIO. Author: Swapnil Bhartiya

A wise person once said: The only thing that is constant is change. Open source cloud solutions like OpenStack are challenging companies to come up with new business models to innovate. It was high time for pure play OpenStack company Mirantis to make the right move in the right direction, at the right time.

In September, Mirantis announced that they acquired TCP Cloud, a company that specializes in managed services for OpenStack. The news stirred the beehive as Mirantis was stepping on some partner toes and it was also moving away from the ‘pure play OpenStack company’ model.

The real value lies in people and not technology

Inspur Joins OpenStack Foundation as the Newest Gold Member

Grazed from Inspur and OpenStack Foundation

Inspur, China's leading cloud computing total solution provider, announced today that OpenStack Board approved Inspur as Gold member of the Foundation, reaffirming the company's commitment to industry collaboration and open standards.

The OpenStack Foundation is the community that promotes the global development, distribution and adoption of the OpenStack cloud operating system, and serves more than 30,000 Individual Members from over 170 countries around the world. Enterprise members are divided into platinum member, gold member, corporate member and other supporters. At present, above 150 global enterprises provide code contributions, product integration, market promotion and capital support for OpenStack open source community.