Federal

FCA green lights cloud technologies

Grazed from BankingTech. Author: Editorial Staff.

Cloud technology has been around for years now and we are all using it in some ways. If you have an iPhone, then you are using the iCloud all day every day without even realising it. Your DropBox, your Google Drive, your Amazon account are all using cloud computing. At work, it’s your Microsoft One Drive or your Evernote application on your tablet that uses the cloud.

We are constantly connected to it and yet, in financial services, the adoption has been tremendously slow. In part, this is due to a lack of guidance from regulators, especially where cloud-based regulation technology is concerned. Finally there is forward progress. The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) in the UK has taken a real step forward to embrace innovation in its recent paper looking at cloud technology, which gives firms clear guidance in the procurement and monitoring of cloud technology providers...

Agencies on a roller coaster ride with cloud spending

Grazed from FederalNewsRadio. Author: Jason Miller.

Sometimes covering the federal IT community is like a bad roller coaster. The buildup when going up the big hill is exciting and stomach churning. But when the downhill falls flat, you feel a little cheated. That’s the feeling today when it comes to cloud computing. You can’t shake a stick at a conference without someone mentioning the need to the cloud. The crucial role software-, platform-, infrastructure-as-a-service play and will continue to play in the future of federal IT always is hot topic.

But then Deltek’s GovWin puts out a report that is like that flat roller coaster ride. GovWin, a market research firm, looked at preliminary federal procurement data for fiscal 2016 that shows spending on cloud computing hasn’t lived up to its hype. GovWin found civilian agencies have awarded $75.4 million in cloud contracts in 2016 and the Defense Department, its services and agencies awarded $45.3 million in 2016...

DOD, Service Branches Say Cloud Migrations Will Depend on Missions, Interoperability

Grazed from FedTech. Author: Phil Goldstein.

The Defense Department is going all-in on the cloud, according to DOD and service branch IT leaders, but how — and how quickly — the services and commands move applications to the cloud will depend on a variety of factors. The migrations will depend on their missions, how apps relate to each other, and the security requirements for the data, they say.

Speaking Wednesday morning at an AFCEA DC event in Arlington, Va., DOD officials argued that they are working to shift their agencies to a new cloud-based world, but acknowledged that it is a major cultural change for many IT workers. The event, moderated by Matt Goodrich, director of the Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program (FedRAMP), offered a deep dive into how the Army, Navy, Air Force and Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) are approaching cloud migrations...

Read more from the source @ http://www.fedtechmagazine.com/article/2016/09/dod-service-branches-say-cloud-migrations-will-depend-missions-interoperability

How DISA shifted from exclusive cloud provider to facilitator

Grazed from FederalNewsRadio. Author: Editorial Staff.

For nearly 10 years, the Defense Information Systems Agency has been working to provide secure cloud computing to DoD agencies. No longer the exclusive cloud provider itself, DISA now helps agencies use commercial providers in a secure way. Nowadays, the effort centers on applications, if they’re ready for cloud hosting and the best way to go about it. John Hale, the cloud portfolio manager at DISA, explains more on Pentagon Solutions.

It’s no secret that the Pentagon’s wartime budget is now funding a lot of day-to-day requirements, but DoD accounting systems can’t tell how much. New estimates from Government Accountability Office says DoD has routinely dipped into its overseas contingency operations account to fund “enduring” requirements since 2009, but there’s no way to tell which account ultimately funded any particular expense, making it very difficult for Congress to oversee DoD’s operations and maintenance accounts. Andrew Van Ah is GAO’s acting director for Defense Capabilities and Management. He spoke with Federal News Radio’s Jared Serbu about the O&M accounting problem.

Read more from the source @ http://federalnewsradio.com/pentagon-solutions/2016/08/disa-shifted-exclusive-cloud-provider-facilitator/

Cloud Computing: DOD Unveils Bold Road Map to Modify IT and Cybersecurity Approaches

Grazed from AFCEA. Author: Sandra Jontz.

New document lays out plans for department-wide operating system, use of CACs, data center consolidation and migration to cloud services. The U.S. Defense Department unveiled Thursday a bold information technology and cybersecurity road map that modifies its approach on several efforts in the rapidly changing environments.

The guide positions the department’s IT infrastructure and processes for a broad impact, in addition to hopes of greater security and scrutiny, said its chief information officer, Terry Halvorsen. Outlined in the nine-page paper are a number of DOD efforts, from its crawl to a department-wide operating system to its plans to ditch use of the common access card, migrate to a cloud environment and consolidate and virtualize its data centers...

Cloud Computing: AWS and Azure get the highest federal security rating: What happens from here?

Grazed from CloudTech. Author: Rick Delgado.

Cloud services have been able to store customers’ data for many years now, but the number of prospective clients for several vendors has recently dramatically increased. Back in late June, the announcement was made that three vendors had received special certifications from the federal government, allowing them to store sensitive data that the government had on hand.

Two of those providers are among the most popular within the cloud market, Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Microsoft Azure, while the third is CSRA’s ARC-P IaaS, a vendor that might not be as universally known as the others but still carries enough weight for those in the know. The news was certainly noteworthy for those providers, but it also has tremendous implications for federal agencies as well as the cloud market as a whole...

Why the DTCC Is Using Amazon’s Cloud

Grazed from FTFNews. Author: Eugene Grygo.

Something interesting is underway as far as cloud computing and securities operations — the Amazon Web Services (AWS) offering has been quietly gaining ground after some initial resistance. I recall that the main concerns about using the AWS cloud revolved around compliance and security.

But Amazon zeroed in on the compliance and security demands and concerns of the securities industry by putting out a document that offers an overview of how AWS meets the regulatory requirements of the SEC’s Office of Compliance Inspections and Examinations (OCIE)...

Federal data makes its way into the cloud

Grazed from NorthumberlandNews. Author: Editorial Staff.

A federal proposal for the use of cloud computing makes it clear that the most sensitive data the government keeps about Canadians won't be allowed to leave the country. Only information the government deems "unclassified" — meaning it's unauthorized release carries little, if any material or physical harm to the government or individual Canadians — will be allowed to cross the border, bound for cloud computing servers in other countries, under the government's newly released cloud computing strategy.

When data does leave the country, it must be encrypted, says the strategy that has been in development for more than a year. Sensitive personal information on Canadians like social insurance numbers and top secret government data will remain on cloud servers in the country so the federal government maintains "sovereign control over its data," the strategy says...

Agencies open up to OpenStack

Grazed from FedScoop. Author: Wyatt Kash.

Three out of four government IT professionals in a new poll say their agencies are now using cloud computing services. The new survey also found that a significant portion of the respondents have favorable perceptions about the cost, security and ease of deploying the popular open source software platform, OpenStack, for their on-premises cloud computing initiatives.

The findings indicate that open source technology, like OpenStack, is coming into wider use within government agencies, with about one-fourth of government respondents reporting that their agencies currently use open source technology for their on-premises cloud services. The technology manages large clusters of compute, storage, and networking resources throughout a datacenter as an alternative to using proprietary cloud software...

Navy, Marine Corps gain new latitude to buy cloud computing services

Grazed from FederalNewsRadio. Author: Jared Serbu.

In a step that may go some way toward reducing some of the red tape between the Defense Department and cloud computing vendors, the Department of the Navy (DoN) said last week that the Navy and Marine Corps can sign off on their own business cases for migrating to commercial cloud vendors without seeking higher-level approval.

The change shaves at least one level of bureaucracy from the process. Previously, any naval component that hoped to move its systems to the cloud had to first complete a standard template making their business case for doing so and then submit it to the DON chief information officer...