Edge Computing

Packet Launches Edge Compute Service to Power Distributed Workloads

Grazed from Packet

Packet, the leading bare metal cloud for developers, today launched a new Edge Compute service with 11 additional global locations and a dynamic spot-market based pricing feature. The service expands upon Packet’s existing bare metal cloud and is targeted at latency specific workloads and software innovators that require global access to un-opinionated infrastructure without the use of virtualization or multi-tenancy.

New locations include Los Angeles, Seattle, Dallas, Chicago, Ashburn, Atlanta, Toronto, Frankfurt, Singapore, Hong Kong, and Sydney - with Paris, London, Sao Paulo, and Mumbai coming online by October. This expands upon Packet’s existing footprints in New York Metro, Sunnyvale, Amsterdam, and Tokyo.

The new Edge Compute locations feature a single powerful server configuration - a “Type 1E” instance based on an Intel SkyLake processor - as well as Packet’s full networking and infrastructure automation suite. Instances are deployable within minutes via API, standard DevOps tools or the Packet portal, and take advantage of a new spot market feature for demand-driven pricing. Customers can leverage their own IP space, deploy global anycast networks and build custom Layer 2 or SD-WAN networks across Packet’s scalable transit and transport network.
 

Vapor IO Delivers True Edge Computing with Project Volutus

Grazed from Vapor IO

Vapor IO, the next generation platform for edge clouds, today announced Project Volutus, which enables cloud providers, wireless carriers and web-scale companies to deliver cloud-based edge computing applications via a network of micro data centers deployed at the base of cell tower sites. The company also announced today that Crown Castle, the nation's largest provider of shared wireless infrastructure, has made a minority investment in Vapor IO to accelerate the project's development and deployment.

Project Volutus is a co-location and "data center as a platform" service, powered by Vapor Edge Computing. Project Volutus offers fully-managed micro data centers at the base of cell towers, literally at the true edge of the wireless network. It combines Vapor IO's patent pending hardware and software technology with the nation's extensive network of cell towers and dense metro fiber to build and operate self-driving, distributed edge data centers in major metropolitan locations.

"Zettabytes of machine to machine communication and new application types will require a shift in how the industry thinks about data centricity and the delivery of edge services," said Cole Crawford, CEO and founder of Vapor IO. "Project Volutus is the most cost-effective way to deliver cloud applications that benefit from last mile wireless proximity and sub 10-millisecond round trip latency. By locating Vapor IO's technology at tower locations and connecting to dense metro fiber, we will provide the fastest, most economical way for cloud providers, telecom carriers and web-scale companies to deliver next generation edge services in every major US city."

Here Are The Key Drivers That Are Pushing Cloud To The Edge

Grazed from Forbes. Author: Editorial Staff.

Today’s cloud computing architecture resembles 70s mainframes. The heavy lifting happens in dense data centers that act as the central point of gravity. In both the scenarios, applications share the underlying infrastructure. While this architecture works for the majority of the scenarios, the emerging use cases demand a different approach.

Edge computing fundamentally changes the cloud by making it distributed and decentralized. With edge, the core building blocks of cloud such as compute, storage, and the network will move closer to the applications. Cloud providers will move abstract layers such as machine learning models, serverless computing, and lightweight databases that run on the core infrastructure to the edge...

Make sense of edge computing vs. cloud computing

Grazed from InfoWorld. Author: David Linthicum.

The internet of things is real, and it’s a real part of the cloud. A key challenge is how you can get data processed from so many devices. Cisco Systems predicts that cloud traffic is likely to rise nearly fourfold by 2020, increasing 3.9 zettabytes (ZB) per year in 2015 (the latest full year for which data is available) to 14.1ZB per year by 2020.

As a result, we could have the cloud computing perfect storm from the growth of IoT. After all, IoT is about processing device-generated data that is meaningful, and cloud computing is about using data from centralized computing and storage. Growth rates of both can easily become unmanageable. So what do we do? The answer is something called “edge computing.”...

Is edge computing set to blow away the cloud?

Grazed from CloudTech. Author: David Trossell.

Just about every new piece of technology is considered disruptive to the extent that they are expected to replace older technologies. Sometimes as with the cloud, old technology is simply re-branded to make it more appealing to customers and thereby to create the illusion of a new market. Let’s remember that cloud computing had previously existed in one shape or form. At one stage it was called on-demand computing, and then it became ‘application service provision’.

Now there is edge computing, which some people are also calling fog computing and which some industry commentators feel is going to replace the cloud as an entity. Yet the question has to be: Will it really? The same viewpoint was given when television was invented. Its invention was meant to be the death of radio. Yet people still tune into radio stations by their thousands each and every day of every year...

Read more from the source @ https://www.cloudcomputing-news.net/news/2017/may/19/edge-computing-set-blow-away-cloud/

Edge computing will blow away the cloud

Grazed from CIO. Author: Clint Boulton.

The ubiquitous cloud computing craze may not be long for this world if venture capitalist Peter Levine is right. The Andreessen Horowitz general partner said that as more computing capabilities move to so-called "edge" devices, including anything from driverless cars and drones to the boundless devices that make up the internet of things (IoT), the cloud will slowly evaporate.

"A large portion of computation that gets done in the cloud today will return to the edge," said Levine at the Wall Street Journal's CIO Network event here Tuesday. Levine said the driverless car, whose 200-plus CPUs effectively make it a "data center on wheels," is a prime example of an edge device whose computing capabilities must be self-contained...

Vapor IO Launches Vapor Edge for Telecom

Grazed from Vapor IO

Vapor IO, the next generation platform for hybrid and edge clouds, today announced Vapor Edge for Telecom, an end-to-end platform for edge computing, now 5G-ready and designed to operate as a self-contained microdatacenter at the base of cell-enabled radio towers.

"Mobile operators and landowners are in an ideal position to capitalize on the emerging need for low-latency edge-computing," said Cole Crawford, CEO and founder of Vapor IO. "They own the key infrastructure, including tens of thousands of remote tower and base station locations with power and high bandwidth backhaul. These locations are ideal for Vapor Edge technology, and Vapor Edge can help carriers upgrade their infrastructure and business models as they move to a fully virtualized infrastructure with edge computing and 5G capabilities."

Vapor Edge is an end-to-end platform for edge computing that provides wireless telecom companies with a simple way to deploy and manage cloud servers that are co-located with their base station equipment. This makes it easy for carriers and wireless base-station landowners to offer cloud compute capabilities in close proximity to the Radio Access Network (RAN), enabling new low-latency applications and creating new business models for these players as they forge partnerships with public cloud providers, web-scale companies and other OTT providers to deliver edge capabilities.