CPU

Cloud Computing: ARM reveals more details on supercomputer architecture plans

Grazed from Computing. Author: Graeme Burton.

ARM has revealed more details about the Scalable Vector Extensions (SVE) technology it is developing for the ARMv8-A architecture that Fujitsu is planning to deploy in the Post-K supercomputer it is building for Japan's RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science. Detailed at the Hot Chips conference in Cupertino, California today, SVE is capable of handling vectors from 128 to 2,048 bits in length, and is intended for supercomputer makers like Fujitsu to help them adopt ARM products and deploy them in the world's biggest and most powerful computers.

SVE is a flexible extension to the ARM instruction set that can shift vector calculations from software into hardware, with the scheduler arranging calculations depending on the hardware available. ARM engineers will, shortly, submit patches to the Gnu Compiler Collection (GCC) and LLVM compiler infrastructure project to support SVE auto-vectorisation...

Gain access to an ARM server running Linux OS, through the cloud

Grazed from ComputerWorld. Author: Adam Shah.

If you want to play with an ARM-based server, you can now apply to gain access to one online through the Linaro Developer Cloud. The cloud service was announced in March but has finally gone live. It's mainly targeted at developers who want to evaluate ARM servers.

The free service is one way to access ARM servers, which aren't widely available. Applications go through an approval process, and only those serious about programming for ARM servers will likely be approved...

Cloud Computing: Who needs faster computers?

 Grazed from TheGuardian.  Author: John Naughton.

Fifty years ago, Gordon Moore, the co-founder of the chip manufacturer Intel described a regularity he had observed that would one day make him a household name. What he had noticed was that the number of transistors that could be fitted on a given area of silicon doubled roughly every two years. And since transistor density is correlated with computing power, that meant that computing power doubled every two years. Thus was born Moore’s law.

At the beginning, few outside of the computer industry appreciated the significance of this. Humanity, it turns out, is not good at understanding the power of doubling – until it’s too late. Remember the fable about the emperor and the man who invented chess. When asked to name his reward, the inventor requested that one grain or rice be placed on the first square of the board, two on the second, four on the third and so on. The Emperor readily agrees, not realising that when you get to the 64th square the pile of rice required would be bigger than Mount Everest...

Cloud Computing: IBM Will Pay Globalfoundries $1.5 Billion to Take Unprofitable Chip Unit

Grazed from Bloomberg.  Author: Alex Barinka and Ian King.

International Business Machines Corp. (IBM:US) agreed to pay Globalfoundries Inc. $1.5 billion to take an unprofitable chip-manufacturing unit off its hands, according to two people with knowledge of the matter.

IBM will also receive $200 million worth of assets, making the net value of the deal $1.3 billion, said the people who asked not to be identified because the agreement is private. The companies plan to announce the deal tomorrow morning, the people said. IBM put out a statement today saying it planned to make a “major business announcement” tomorrow...

Cavium Moves Into The Cloud With ThunderX Processors

Grazed from InvestorsBusiness Daily.  Author: 

Chip designer Cavium (NASDAQ:CAVM) is back above its 50-day moving average and appears to be working on the right side of a base.  If so, it would be a base-on-base pattern. The stock has been moving basically sideways since 2011. During that time, earnings growth slowed, but it has since revved up, thanks to new products and increased sales of chips used in new technologies.

Cavium designs systems-on-a-chip for the networking, telecom, storage, wireless, security and video markets. The company is best known for its core embedded chips and encrypting security processor chips. Its biggest customer, Cisco Systems (NASDAQ:CSCO), accounted for 19% of sales last year...

Cloud Computing: IBM's SyNAPSE chip moves even closer to brain-like computing

Grazed from GigaOm. Author: Signe Brewster.

IBM’s pursuit of a chip far more powerful, small and light than the existing options takes its inspiration from a familiar source: the human brain. The company revealed the second generation of its SyNAPSE chip today that lead researcher Dharmendra Modha described as “a supercomputer the size of a stamp, the weight of a feather.” And it consumes the same amount of power as a hearing aid.

“I’m holding in my hand a new machine for a new era,” Modha said in an interview. “When we started the SyNAPSE project many people thought it was impossible. As we look to the future, possible can become real. This could open up a whole new frontier of scientific exploration and commercial exploitation.”...

Intel Introduces Custom Cloud Chip

Grazec from NYTimes. Author: Quentin Hardy.

Intel is solving a tough business problem, using a little technical innovation. The company said Wednesday that it would enable its Xeon processor, used inside big computing environments, to handle a customer’s large-scale proprietary algorithms as if the chip were customized for that process.

The idea is to enable some of computing’s biggest workloads, like security for a telecommunications company, or Facebook’s widely used homepage, to work faster across thousands of computer servers at once. Provided those are servers with this Xeon chip. Taking advantage of the optimized chip, “applications should work twice as fast as before,” said Diane Bryant, general manager of Intel’s data center group. “As cloud computing grows, the infrastructure of it has to change.”...

Energy-Sipping ARM Chips Made For Cloud

Grazed from InformationWeek.  Author: Charles Babcock.

Applied Micro Circuits and Canonical planned to demonstrate an OpenStack cloud running on a rack of ARM servers at the Computex tradeshow Friday in Taiwan. Major server manufacturers, including Dell and HP, and original design manufacturers from around the world, such as Quanta, Avnet, and Hyve, were expected to view the demonstration.

ARM is the chip used in many smartphones and mobile devices, and it's not usually associated with either enterprise data centers or cloud computing. But Applied Micro will show a rack of 14 servers based on its X-Gene server chip. They will be running Icehouse, the latest version of OpenStack, under Canonical's Ubuntu Linux...

Server CPU Performance Pre and Post Cloud Computing - infographic

Grazed from ProfitBricks. Author: Andy Lurie.

Remember When CPU Performance was Guaranteed? Since the early launch of the PC in the early 1980’s, CPU performance has been defined by the clock speed and front side bus of the processer. It was simple and easy to understand and Intel and AMD battled the MHz and GHz wars over the years.

Server CPU Speeds

This infographic looks at server class CPUs from the Pentium era CPUs of 1993 to today. Along the way, a lot of new technologies totally transformed the way we look at CPU performance. Beginning with the advent of X86 server virtualization in 2001, VMware and other virtualization technologies permitted multiple operating systems, and their related processes, to be run in parallel on a single CPU...

Server CPU Performance Pre and Post Cloud Computing

Grazed from ProfitBricks. Author: Andy Lurie.

Remember When CPU Performance was Guaranteed? Since the early launch of the PC in the early 1980’s, CPU performance has been defined by the clock speed and front side bus of the processer. It was simple and easy to understand and Intel and AMD battled the MHz and GHz wars over the years.

Server CPU Speeds

This infographic looks at server class CPUs from the Pentium era CPUs of 1993 to today. Along the way, a lot of new technologies totally transformed the way we look at CPU performance. Beginning with the advent of X86 server virtualization in 2001, VMware and other virtualization technologies permitted multiple operating systems, and their related processes, to be run in parallel on a single CPU. Instead of relying on the old model of “one server, one application” which lead to under-utilized resources, virtual resources are dynamically applied to meet business needs without any excess “fat.”...