Contributed

Key Benefits of the Cloud in Healthcare

The healthcare industry is among the fastest when it comes to implementing cloud computing across the board. A few years ago, big industry players were still focusing on medical imaging and the implementation of electronic health records of EHRs. Today, however, a lot of big hospitals and medical institutions are fully utilizing the cloud to their advantage.

Speaking of advantages, there are a number of key benefits offered by the implementation of cloud in healthcare. These benefits are not just helping healthcare service providers operate better, but benefiting patients as well. Here are the key benefits of the cloud in healthcare.

Faster and More Accurate Treatments

Doctors, physicians, and nurses - healthcare providers in general - rely on information to provide patients with accurate and effective treatments. The information they needed was stored in the form of printed documents and offline digital archives. Before doctors could gain access to a patient's complete medical records, they needed to jump through hoops to get them.

How iPaaS Is Extending Cloud Functionality

Just a few short years ago, the terms ‘cloud' and ‘cloud computing' were reserved for an elite few techies who understood the inner workings of cyberspace. Now these have become household words and although most businesses still don't quite comprehend what it means to work in the cloud, they know that it saves them money and are being told that they can save even more along the line because cloud-based servers are totally scalable.

As more space is needed to integrate various software stored either locally or elsewhere around the web, you can scale up, but if you find that you are not using the space you thought you would require, you can scale down. It's amazing what you can do with an integration Platform as a Service in terms of functionality, but first, you probably want to know what iPaaS is and what it means to your business.

A Brief Rundown on iPaaS

Sales in the Cloud: Different Ways Cloud Computing Is Aiding Sales

Cloud computing has been helping businesses achieve unbelievable levels of efficiency over the years. Anything from Enterprise Resource Planning or ERP to Human Resources (HR) and communications are now relying on cloud infrastructure one way or another. It is also worth noting that cloud computing allows businesses to store and process a large amount of data at a relatively low cost.

In this article, however, we're going to focus more on how cloud tools and services can be used to help sales. There are some interesting resources and solutions designed specifically to help a business's sales department become more effective.

Cloud-Based CRM

Customer Relationship Management or CRM is a great platform to use for managing customers. The use of CRM allows corporations to offer more personalized services to each customer through the method of collecting data and the history of interactions within the system. I say "history of interactions" because a good CRM platform can record more than just purchases and invoices.

How Cloud Call Centers Are Taking Steps to Improve on Security

We think of the Cloud as this wonderful way to store data and information that is then accessible to us any time, and in any place. Cloud applications are able to reach across all different industries and be used in unique ways. With that said, the Cloud isn't perfect, in fact security issues have become quite the topic where the Cloud is concerned. One area where that is particularly true is with Cloud call centers. It has led people to ask what steps are being taken by these call centers to improve upon security.

Call Centers - Nothing New

Call centers themselves are nothing new. These have been used for decades in order to provide customers and clients with support when needed and assistance when needed. The ability to talk to a live operator is attractive for many people.

A Comprehensive Guide to Cloud Backup Solutions

Businesses are now seeking cloud-based solutions that provide the level of security and backup functionality they have come to expect from on-premises deployment.

With cybercrime posing a significant threat to organizations of all sizes, most companies are looking for a cloud service that can secure their data while pushing their operations into the future. While Microsoft Office 365 does provide the native security and backup functionality companies require, it may fail to provide the peace of mind and protection an organization needs.

If you are evaluating whether to deploy Office 365, we are providing a comprehensive guide to a third-party backup tool that can support the cloud solution.

Data Recovery
 

Cloud Computing. The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.

Article Written by David Marshall

Cloud computing is absolutely one of those words that shows up on everyone's "Tech Buzzword Bingo" cards. Even so, that shouldn't and doesn't negate the fact that cloud computing is driving innovation across many industries and will continue to provide a significant impact on revenue in the coming years. 

Recently, hybrid cloud has become the cloud model of choice for many companies looking to foster greater flexibility into their infrastructure, and it can do so in a cost-effective manner. For many, hybrid seems to be a good way to ease into things, allowing a company to keep some data on-premises while freeing up some of their infrastructure by moving other data up into the public cloud.

But like so many things in life, it isn't all good all the time.  So what's the good, the bad and the ugly? 

What have we learned from the Amazon AWS and Microsoft Azure outages?

Article Written by David Marshall



In the past month both AWS and Microsoft Azure have experienced lengthy outages due to issues with the storage supporting the cloud. These outages have flooded through companies globally and brought into focus the potential downsides of putting all your eggs into the public cloud basket. After both of these incidents, the question is, how reliable is the public cloud and what options and alternatives are available?

A few technology experts have offered their opinion:

The best of both worlds is a multi-cloud strategy

 

Are You Scared of the Cloud? Well You Should Be…

Are you afraid of using cloud services? Well, you should be because the very computing service's model introduces many different reasons to be concerned. There are a number of security flaws common across many different cloud services. In some cases, the cloud service or website poses a security threat and risk to one's privacy by its very design. Let's look at the biggest problems that come with using cloud services, websites and their associated apps.

Non secure Exchanges of Information

When you are connected to the cloud, you have to exchange information with the cloud servers. Your data is at risk when you upload it to the cloud or download it. Dropbox had to patch a flaw found in 2015 that allowed hackers to steal new information uploaded to its cloud through compromised third party Android apps. This is separate from the 2011 glitch that temporarily allowed anyone with a password to log in and view customer accounts.

The Important Elements of a Digital Transformation

Digital transformation has easily become a core focus for companies across the globe. Many businesses are now looking at ways to introduce the use of analytics, social media, mobile technology and innovative software to improve their internal processes, value propositions and customer relationships.

However, to successfully embark with a digital transformation, you must first look at the important elements to ensure you create a successful strategy.

Understanding the Customer

Amazon Corrects Massive AWS S3 Cloud Outage While Vendors React

Article Written by David Marshall

Last Tuesday, parts of the Internet came to a grinding halt when the servers that powered them suddenly vanished.  The disappearing server act came from servers that were housed as part of Amazon S3, Amazon's popular Web hosting service.

When that incident happened, several big and popular services and Web sites were disrupted, including DraftKings, Gizmodo, IFTTT, Quora, Slack and Trello.

According to the Web site monitoring firm Apica, 54 of the largest online retailers experienced performance impairments on their Web sites, with some slowing down by more than 20 percent; 3 sites went down completely (Express, Lulu Lemon, One Kings Lane); and for effected websites, average slow down time was 29.7 seconds - 42.7 seconds to load.

What happened?

"At 9:37 a.m. PST, an authorized S3 team member using an established playbook executed a command which was intended to remove a small number of servers for one of the S3 subsystems that is used by the S3 billing process," Amazon said.  "Unfortunately, one of the inputs to the command was entered incorrectly and a larger set of servers was removed than intended.  The servers that were inadvertently removed supported two other S3 subsystems."

Those subsystems are important.  One of them "manages the metadata and location information of all S3 objects in the region," according to Amazon.  And without it, services that depend on it couldn't perform basic data retrieval and storage tasks.  The second subsystem, the placement subsystem, "manages allocation of new storage and requires the index subsystem to be functioning properly to correctly operate."  The placement subsystem is used to allocate storage for new objects.