Cloud Solutions

Cloud-to-client, direct: serverless computing reduces the middle

Grazed from ZDNet. Author: Joe McKendrick.

One of the buzzwords to emerge over the past year is that of "serverless" computing or architecture, which, as the term suggests, involves the provisioning of key information technology resources to users without the fuss and muss of acquiring and activating additional hardware, which not only means servers, but disk space as well. Let the cloud vendors worry about the messy details of protocols, security, resource provisioning, processor speeds, and memory allocation, and focus on the applications business users need to run their organizations.

Serverless is, for all intents and purposes, another name for Platform as a Service. There are vendor tools and environments suited for such a purpose, including Amazon Web Services Lambda, IBM BlueMix OpenWhisk, and Microsoft Azure Functions, Buzzwording aside, full-throttle adoption of serverless platforms may even stir rethinking of optimal hybrid cloud architectures, and what it means for IT teams to serve as brokers of needed business services...

Read more from the source @ http://www.zdnet.com/article/cloud-to-client-computing-serverless-computing-reduces-the-middle/

This Chicago Startup is Bringing Supercomputing to the Cloud

Grazed from ChicagoInno. Author: Ustav Gandhi.

Supercomputing has changed the way we process big data in a wide range of industries. Unsurprisingly, these capabilities to perform multiple complex tasks in the least possible amount of time have traditionally come at a price -- in fact, even the first one hundred supercomputers were sold at a price of $8 million each (hefty, especially by the standards of early 1960s standards when they first launched). While this price point has mostly restricted supercomputing to academia, federal research labs and large industry, Parallel Works, a startup incubated at the University of Chicago’s Polsky Exchange, is out to democratize this -- by bringing the underlying technology to the cloud.

Parallel Works’ platform takes supercomputing to the software-as-a-service, pay-per-use model, thus removing talent and resource maintenance costs typically associated with big machines. The software is domain agnostic--employed in applications as diverse as climate change research to neuroscience to mass media analysis--and the technology's custom interface can be packaged, stored, and deployed as per the needs of the client or industry...

Is dynamic resource execution the answer to auto-scaling cloud apps?

Grazed from NetworkWorld. Author: Chen Wu.

Dynamic resource management for cloud computing is at a critical crossroad. The ultimate objective when provisioning software-defined infrastructure, synchronizing inter-cloud resources, or allocating network bandwidth is allowing applications to successfully execute on demand without concern for capacity. While these approaches are effective in supplying applications with additional capacity on demand, the downside is that application performance may not be optimized in the process.

Cloud applications and services have become so complex that the runtime synchronization of resources required to support them drags down overall performance and leaves capacity unused. To tap this unused capacity, and deliver the performance expected, we need to enhance resource management with something like intelligent resource execution. Let me explain...

That was the year that was: 2016 in cloud - and what’s on the horizon for 2017

Grazed from CloudTech. Author: Editorial Staff.

2016 was an interesting year in cloud computing. For the European market, data protection regulation came into force, while many of the major cloud providers began to move their operations into and build data centres in Europe, from AWS, to Microsoft, to IBM. Regarding acquisitions, Oracle bought NetSuite, Microsoft bought LinkedIn and Samsung acquired Joyent, while in terms of trends, DevOps, containers and security continued to be the primary talking points. Here is our short review of the main stories from the more than 400 that went live on CloudTech last year:

2016 in review

AWS celebrates its 10th birthday. On March 14 2006, a press release went out on the wire from Amazon announcing “a simple storage service that offers software developers a highly scalable, reliable, and low-latency data storage infrastructure at very low costs.” Thus AWS was born, and a decade on the company enjoys significant market share leadership in the IaaS space...

Read more from the source @ http://www.cloudcomputing-news.net/news/2017/jan/05/was-year-was-2016-cloud-and-whats-horizon-2017/

Cloud Computing: HIPAA Data Security - Doesn’t Have to Mean High Cost For Small Medical Practices

Grazed from TechFeatured. Author: Editorial Staff.

The American healthcare system is moving forward. Thanks to the HITECH Act of 2009, physicians and hospitals are encouraged with $19 billion dollars in spending to convert their old paper charts to new Electronic Health Records (EHR). Medical records and physician charts are essential for the smooth operation and delivery of optimal and continuous healthcare. These records must be available to the doctor or nurse at all times and should be easy to access when needed.

The thought of spending time and money to overhaul a fully-immersed and often entirely adequate paper system can be overwhelming to small medical practices. Smaller practices do not usually have the technological resources to keep up with new standards of protected health information (PHI) storage and delivery...

Cloud Computing: Microsoft's new service turns FAQs into bots

Grazed from InfoWorld. Author: Blair Hanley Frank.

Finding customer service help online can be a pain. Filtering through a knowledge base to find the right answer to your question can be an exercise in fighting with nested frequently asked questions documents. Microsoft is aiming to help by making it easier for companies to create intelligent bots that can answer common questions.

The QnA Maker, launched in beta on Tuesday, will let users train an automated conversation partner on existing frequently-asked-questions content. After that information is fed in, the service will create a bot that will respond to customer questions with the content from the knowledge base...

ZTE makes case for link between fog computing and cloud to bolster 5G, IoT

Grazed from RCRWireless. Author: Dan Meyer.

In a move to combine what it sees as similar technology attributes, ZTE offered up a support for combining work being conducted in cloud and fog computing. Participating in the International Telecommunications Union’s Eighth CTO meeting in Thailand, the vendor said it analyzed online video, augmented reality, virtual reality, large-scale “internet of things” and other application scenarios in pointing out similar concepts behind fog computing and multi-access edge computing.

Those efforts were said to be placed under a “cloud-fog collaboration” system architecture. ZTE explained that while a solid cloud platform is required to deal with the generation, transmission and processing of massive data, performance and latency requirements for AR and VR in particular will require edge-based platforms...

How small businesses should be using the cloud

Grazed from TheRiotAct. Author: Rachel Ziv.

If you’re confused by all this talk of “cloud computing”, you’re not alone. It’s one of those terms that everyone uses, but not a lot of people seem to know what it means. The term has become synonymous with the internet in recent times, and many are proclaiming its wonders and ability to save individuals and businesses a ton of money, time and stress. So … what is it? And how exactly does it work?

Rahul Chawla, tech mastermind from Technowand in Mitchell, has been helping local businesses replace their traditional infrastructure with cloud computing for years. “It’s the way of the future,” says Rahul. “Gone are the days of expensive servers, email exchange and software licenses that only last a few years. You don’t need to spend hundreds or thousands of dollars on anti-virus or Microsoft Office software. You don’t even really need to own a powerful computer anymore...

Serendipity in the Cloud

Grazed from Strategy-Business. Author: Matt Palmquist.

As managers face increasing pressure from stakeholders to make supply chains eco-friendly, companies are on the hunt for new and inexpensive tools, partners, or processes that can improve the sustainability of their operations. But according to a new study, one solution may already exist: Cloud computing could improve supply chains’ environmental performance while also cutting costs.

When firms move their data from in-house servers to the cloud, they can save money on maintaining IT infrastructure and storage. Hosting applications, information, and networks on the cloud, typically through a third-party service at a much lower cost than a physical setup, also allows companies to quickly analyze and disseminate data, loop in partners, and scale their technology needs to accommodate changing budget and business requirements...

Read more from the source @ http://www.strategy-business.com/blog/Serendipity-in-the-Cloud

Networked cloud emerges to meet evolving infrastructure needs

Grazed from TechTarget. Author: Editorial Staff.

The networked cloud is slowly emerging as the answer to any number of enterprise questions. In some cases, organizations deploy cloud networking technologies to more effectively manage applications as they migrate to the cloud. Other companies are easing into a networked cloud model as an efficiency measure because they lack the IT staff to manage their own infrastructure or the in-house security expertise to keep it secure.

Art Chernobrov, manager of identity access and messaging for Hyatt Hotels Corp., said Hyatt turned to cloud networking and management software to more effectively run networked communications between 60 hotels in China and the company's headquarters back in North America...