Botnets

Wipro Launches the HOLMES Cloud BOT

Grazed from Wipro Limited

Wipro Limited, a leading global information technology, consulting and business process services company, today announced the launch of the Wipro HOLMES Cloud BOT - a continuously learning digital consultant that leverages Wipro’s BoundaryLess Data Center solution.

The Wipro HOLMES Cloud BOT uses a gamified natural language processing (NLP)-based chat interface to have an intelligent interaction with stakeholders to enrich the data for cloud analysis. It leverages the Wipro HOLMES Artificial Intelligence Platform that helps enterprises hyper-automate processes, redefine operations and enable their digital journeys. HOLMES represents Wipro’s integrated automation capabilities across infrastructure, applications and business process services, delivered through a comprehensive blend of tasks, processes, and cognitive technologies.

The Wipro HOLMES Cloud BOT leverages applications and infrastructure data residing in multiple data sources in the client’s environment, and facilitates collaboration between stakeholders from IT and business teams to create a comprehensive digital repository. This helps in analyzing and predicting viable cloud placement decisions, based on rule-based algorithms and past learning to accelerate the client’s cloud journey.
 

How free cloud services become free, currency-mining, DDoS-attacking botnets

Grazed from Gigaom. Author: Derrick Harris.

It’s no secret that the cloud has the potential to be a hacker’s paradise, chock-full of all the password-cracking computing power a trove of stolen credit cards can buy. Surely, though, this type of bad behavior can’t be carried out without any direct financial investment. After all, the free tiers on most cloud computing services are pretty minimal — a single core (probably fairly weak) and maybe a few gigabytes of storage. What can anyone do with that? A whole lot, if they’re clever.

At the Black Hat security conference this week, a pair of professional penetration testers, Rob Ragan and Oscar Salazar of Bishop Fox, showed how they built a functional 1,000-node botnet by stringing together resources from a variety of services. They used it to mine some Litecoin and could have done a whole lot more if they weren’t trying to minimize harm to other cloud users (by being noisy neighbors) or cloud providers (by driving up power bills)...