Big Data

IBM snaps up Compose to extend its cloudy database options

Grazed from Fortune. Author: Barb Darrow.

IBM continues to build out its database portfolio with the acquisition of Compose, which offers several open-source-oriented database options. Compose, which raised about $6.4 million dollars since its founding in 2011, is privately held; terms of the IBM purchase were not disclosed.

What Compose, in Mountain View, Calif., brings to the table is a way to attract a new flock of web and mobile developers that are not part of the IBM enterprise rubric and let them try out lightweight database services based on MongoDB, Redis, Elasticsearch, PostgreSQL, RethinkDB and other databases...

Cloud Computing: SAP Kills Two Birds With One Stone, Integrating Predictive Analytics with Big Data & IoT

Grazed from Forbes.  Author: Editorial Staff.

Last month, global software giant SAP SE announced that its Predictive Analytics Software has been upgraded to include integration for big data and Internet of Things (IoT) analytics. The stronger integration of SAP HANA analytics with IoT serves the increasing number of customers that apply analytics to the enormous amount of data generated in IoT applications. From an analytics standpoint, customers will now be able to gain insights into big data derived from IoT. On the other hand, IoT enterprises will be able to gain analytical insights that were insofar not available as easily.

This gives SAP a dual advantage in the two budding and highly sought after markets, namely predictive analytics and IoT.  SAP has been aggressively making a push into IoT , and the latest update to its Predictive Analytics software further expands its product portfolio in the IoT market. It also gives the company another step up against competition from leading cloud computing vendor, Salesforce.com, which is targeting the cloud analytics market as its next growth frontier...

Better Analytics Must Address Cloud Computing's Remaining Challenges

Grazed from InformationWeek. Author: Bob Violino.

Without proper analytics in place, many cloud services customers are wasting resources, struggling with compliance and suffering from outages and unexpected costs, according to a new study from Forrester Research. The study, sponsored by enterprise cloud hosting provider iLand, shows that all of the 275 IT decision makers and senior business executives surveyed in the United States, United Kingdom and Singapore said they’ve experienced at least one negative financial or operational impact due to missing or hidden metadata.

These negative business impacts include outages, wasted resources, unexpected costs and challenges reporting to management. “Companies aren’t just using the cloud—they depend on it,” the report says. “Nevertheless, cloud providers fail to keep cloud users happy. As companies expand their use of cloud services, they need to be confident that their cloud providers aren’t holding anything back, and are committed to their success.”...

Big data in the cloud - where next?

Grazed from InformationAge. Author: Ben Rossi.

Big data is to the information age what the steam engine was to the industrial revolution. From expanding user intelligence to improving operational efficiencies, big data has revolutionised market places. IDC predicts that by 2020 we will create 44 zettabytes, or 44 trillion gigabytes, of data annually. To transform big data into information that drives business value it needs to be analysed. Unsurprisingly, crunching big data requires seriously big compute and a solid infrastructure to support it.

The data boom

Our insatiable desire for data insights did not begin with big data. If we look back to the 90s tech boom, business intelligence (BI) tools were the new big thing. BI allowed organisations to report and analyse company data, but unfortunately these systems were confined to dedicated data warehouses running specialist servers. As a result, conducting BI was too expensive and technical for the majority of enterprises.

See more at: http://www.information-age.com/technology/cloud-and-virtualisation/123459765/big-data-cloud-where-next#sthash.PyXDoyGM.dpuf

Cloud data warehouse race heats up

 Grazed from ZDNet.  Author: Andrew Brust.

The notion of running a data warehouse in the cloud was a pretty novel thing when Amazon Web Services launched its Redshift service in November of 2012. Most on-premises data warehouse (DW) platforms are appliance-based, which makes them difficult to expand, and the resulting need to leave room for growth also makes them expensive to acquire.

In the cloud though, economics are better, elasticity is realistic and logistics are streamlined. Combine that with the ability to handle "big data" volumes with the familiar SQL/relational model that Redshift uses and it's hardly surprising that the service has been one of Amazon's fastest growing since its launch...

Unifying the big content, big data divide

Grazed from CCI.  Author: Mika Javanainen.

While cloud computing is credited with offering more effective ways to utilise applications, it can also further complicate the task of document and content management with the introduction of new sets of information silos.  Many companies are encountering issues with ‘dark data’ because they maintain multiple information silos in the cloud and on-premises that contain business-critical data sets that other systems cannot leverage. These repositories often contain massive amounts of Big Data (structured data) and Big Content (unstructured content).

To effectively connect these silos and ensure information workers have fast access to all of the content they need, it’s important to first understand their differences. Structured data (Big Data) is information that resides in various databases and business systems such as CRM and ERP solutions -- much of which is often maintained by different lines of business and isolated to specific users and applications...

Embedding BI In The Cloud

Grazed from TalkinCloud. Author: Mike Vizard.

One of the biggest limitations of most software-as-a-service (SaaS) and mobile applications is that they generally don't come with much in the way of business intelligence (BI) functionality built into the application. This usually results in end users having to fire up yet another application to analyze data inside any given application.

Now TIBCO Software is making it simpler to embed business intelligence inside a multi-tenant cloud application environment with the release of version 6.1 of TIBCO Jaspersoft BI software. Mike Boyarski, director of product marketing for TIBCO Analytics at TIBCO Software, said enhanced for support for multi-tenant clouds, coupled with support for JavaScript, application programming interfaces (APIs) and HTML5, will make it a lot easier to embed BI functionality directly into an array of mobile and SaaS application services...

Read more from the source @ http://talkincloud.com/cloud-computing/06172015/embedding-bi-cloud

Oracle's Cloud Business Grows on Big Data: Time to Invest?

Grazed from Nasdaq.  Author: Editorial Staff.

Oracle's third-quarter fiscal 2015 results gained significantly from the cloud business. The company's earnings surpassed the Zacks Consensus Estimate, while revenues came in line. We believe that the rapid adoption of engineered systems and cloud suites will drive the top line in 2015.

Oracle commands a dominant position in the enterprise software and database management system (DBMS) software market. According to market research firm Gartner, global spending on IT infrastructure is estimated to grow 2.4% to $3.8 trillion in 2015. Among infrastructure, DBMS is expected to gain significantly driven by Big Data and digitalization initiatives. We believe Oracle is positioned well in the DBMS software market to gain from this trend...

Cloud Computing: How Amazon's DynamoDB helped reinvent databases

Grazed from NetworkWorld. Author: Brandon Butler.

Behind every great ecommerce website is a database, and in the early 2000s Amazon.com’s database was not keeping up with the company’s business. Part of the problem was that Amazon didn’t have just one database – it relied on a series of them, each with its own responsibility.

As the company headed toward becoming a $10 billion business, the number and size of its SQL databases exploded and managing them became more challenging. By the 2004 holiday shopping rush, outages became more common, caused in large part by overloaded SQL databases. Something needed to change...

Human DNA database race to the clouds

Grazed from BWorldOnline. Author: Editorial Staff.

Academic institutions and health-care companies are picking sides between their cloud computing offerings -- Google Genomics or Amazon Web Services -- spurring the two to one-up each other as they win high-profile genomics business, according to interviews with researchers, industry consultants and analysts.

That growth is being propelled by, among other forces, the push for personalized medicine, which aims to base treatments on a patient’s DNA profile. Making that a reality will require enormous quantities of data to reveal how particular genetic profiles respond to different treatments...