Avery Phillips

The Benefits of Moving IT Management to the Cloud



Article Written by Avery Phillips

 

When it comes to moving IT management to the cloud, there is no one size-fits-all strategy. In fact, patience and research are essential to making sure that a company finds the solution that is right for them. It takes time to align resources, build capacity, and engage vendors to make sure everyone is on the same page. 

Cloud solutions range from hybrid solutions, in which some information is stored locally and the rest on the cloud, to the choices between private and public cloud services. No matter which way a company chooses to go, though, there are some clear benefits of moving IT management to the cloud. 

Using a trusted IT management software can eliminate some of the problems and concerns many businesses have and make the process of moving to the cloud a much simpler one. When it comes right down to it though, what are the advantages of moving your IT to the cloud?

How Cloud Technology Is Helping Teens Drive Safer



Article Written by Avery Phillips

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "in 2016, 2,433 teens in the U.S.from ages 16-19 were killed in motor vehicle crashes." That means for teens, who are still getting the hang of driving, crashes remain to be the number one cause of death. 

Fortunately, cloud-based technology is helping teen drivers stay safe on the road and protecting them against accidents. Although the word "technology" might set off alarm bells among parents who associated it with distracted driving, it's important for parents to recognize that technology can, in fact, be beneficial to their teen drivers. 

It's a big bad world out there, especially on the highway, and while the number of deadly accidents has decreased since the 1970s, teenagers are still three times more likely to be involved in a deadly crash. Even though you're aware of the dangers around you on the road, your fearless teen might not be. So how can you enforce safe driving habits when you aren't there to guide them? Let cloud technology do it for you. Remember, as long as you teach young drivers safe technology habits, they can reap the countless rewards it offers. 

How Has the Cloud Affected the World of Urban Planning



Article Written by Avery Phillips

For a number of years, urban planners have been working with software known as building information modeling (BIM). Essentially, this is software that allows the importing and integration of 3D building design into a program that analyzes data regarding energy impacts, environmental and community impacts, and construction compliance with local building codes and regulations. 

Of course the next step in this process is to go beyond BIM and the design of buildings that comply with city codes and local regulations into full city information modeling (CIM) that can essentially do the same thing on a larger scale. The full impact of any number of project types can now be automated, and these tasks can be performed on the cloud. 

This has become possible as GIS and other mapping software has continued to move toward cloud computing instead of server or machine-based applications. ESRI took leaps forward in this area with ArcGIS online, along with launching software developed in cooperation with the company SmarterBetterCities. The company is based in Switzerland and is the designer of CloudCity, a cloud-based CIM-specific system. 

Many of these CIM systems have been developed by urban planners who have been analyzing this type of data for years, but doing so manually. The automation process takes something that used to take a couple of dozen specialists a number of weeks to complete and automates it so results are available nearly instantaneously.

 

How Small Businesses Will Increasingly Rely on Cloud Applications

Article Written by Avery Phillips

While us who follow cloud computing news know the truth, passersby often look past the technology and miss its future potential. But the way it's changing the world of business is incredible. All different kinds of industries are taking part in this digital interconnected revolution, from marketing and retail firms to medical professionals using it in their work. Even artists collaborate with each other across state or country lines using it. 

Let's examine the future uses of the cloud for small businesses everywhere. If you can get ahead of the curve, then you may be able to operate your business on a better level competitively before the rest of the world catches on.

Google's Mobile-First Search Algorithm & the Cloud



Article Written by Avery Phillips

For the past few years, business owners have been scrambling to rework their websites to fit mobile technology. If you don't keep up, you will be left behind. Right now, mobile is king and Google sets the pace. 

Late in 2017, Google decided to redesign their algorithm to prioritize mobile-optimized pages. Since more people (63 percent) now search using mobile devices, and almost 75 percent of all online searches run through Google, this is news that you cannot ignore. As of June of this year, websites that run quickly on mobile now rank higher than those that load slowly. 

Unfortunately, this puts a lot of businesses in a bind. If previously your website came up on top of a Google search, you may now find yourself buried beneath a lot of responsive, mobile-ready, dynamic loading websites. So what can you do about it?

Decluttering the Cloud: How to Minimize Your Digital Footprint



Written by Avery Phillips

The urge to take your office, business, or household paperless holds countless advantages. No more file cabinets full of records, no countless bills in the mail, no more bank statements laying around, and a lot less shredding of sensitive documents as they age all sound pretty good, and they are. 

However, digital storage is not without cost. There is no such thing as the cloud. The cloud is simply someone else's computer, and that computer takes power and resources to run. While most cloud server farms are going green and use renewable energy, there are still resources used to store your data. 

There is also the issue of privacy. The more of your data that is online and the more places you store it, the more vulnerable you are. While there is more cloud adoption with businesses than ever before, 54 percent of those businesses are vulnerable to cyberattacks. 

So how do you declutter your personal cloud and minimize your digital footprint?

Regulating Stress in the Cloud

Article Written by Avery Phillips

When we consider the digital frontier, our inclination is typically to look at how changes in technology are changing industries. And in a lot of ways that makes sense given the fact industries are capable of adopting and implementing on a large scale, and thus they showcase the potential impact of certain aspects of new tech. 

Yet underneath this drive within companies to be innovative there lies the core reality that it all comes back to how consumers - and human beings in general - are able to utilize technology overall, and in this case the cloud specifically, to bolster quality of life. 

Stress is an issue so widespread in varying degrees, its significance is often underrated. But, what research shows is that stress contributes to a wide range of serious chronic diseases. It's an inevitable part of life that we all deal with at one time or another, but it doesn't have be a serious game changer. 

The cloud can provide a method for individuals to regulate their stress on a daily basis in a way that previous generations never before had the ability to do; ultimately that means stress as a whole may take a back seat for some individuals, which is right where it belongs.

Ditching Legacy Systems: Why Moving Payroll to the Cloud is Beneficial


Article Written by Avery Phillips

While using the cloud to handle payroll is nothing new - it was already in use in 2011 - bigger companies have been slower to adapt than small businesses and startups. Let's look at why companies would be better off following the fairly recent trend of ditching legacy systems and migrating to the cloud.

The Legacy System and Security

Genomics & the Cloud: What's Next?

Article Written by Avery Phillips

Saving patient data to the cloud can mean using big data to improve medicine and discover problems that doctors might have missed. Uploading an entire gene sequence and studying the sequence - a branch of molecular biology known as genomics - could have an even bigger impact on medicine as a whole in the coming years. Let's look at the good and bad of the future of genomics and the cloud.

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Personalized Gene Editing

One of the biggest advancements in recent years is CRISPR, a method of editing genes that has made editing individual genes much easier and cheaper than in the past. It can be used to fight world hunger by making plants produce more fruit or become more resistant to anything from weather, insects, or blight, and even edit a person's genes. It's not quite at the stage where it's ready for humans, but it's close. 

Now, combine an easy way to edit genes with big data. First, the patient's gene sequence is uploaded to the cloud. This lets a computer comb through and identify what could be changed with CRISPR, to either reduce the chance for disease or eliminate it entirely could be in our near future. It seems like something out of a sci-fi movie, but it could very soon be a reality. Using big data to essentially crowdsource the solution to medical problems is not new, however.

Careers in Health Informatics & the Cloud



Article Written by Avery Phillips

Thanks to big data, the cloud, and the ever-advancing march of technology, the face of healthcare is changing. With that comes the need for additional staff trained in how to use technology to its fullest in order to better serve patients. From treating chronic diseases through research, management, and prevention, to trying to combat SIDS in infants, let's look at at what these new careers do, and how they use the cloud to do their job.