Avery Phillips

Decluttering the Cloud: How to Minimize Your Digital Footprint



Written by Avery Phillips

The urge to take your office, business, or household paperless holds countless advantages. No more file cabinets full of records, no countless bills in the mail, no more bank statements laying around, and a lot less shredding of sensitive documents as they age all sound pretty good, and they are. 

However, digital storage is not without cost. There is no such thing as the cloud. The cloud is simply someone else's computer, and that computer takes power and resources to run. While most cloud server farms are going green and use renewable energy, there are still resources used to store your data. 

There is also the issue of privacy. The more of your data that is online and the more places you store it, the more vulnerable you are. While there is more cloud adoption with businesses than ever before, 54 percent of those businesses are vulnerable to cyberattacks. 

So how do you declutter your personal cloud and minimize your digital footprint?

Regulating Stress in the Cloud

Article Written by Avery Phillips

When we consider the digital frontier, our inclination is typically to look at how changes in technology are changing industries. And in a lot of ways that makes sense given the fact industries are capable of adopting and implementing on a large scale, and thus they showcase the potential impact of certain aspects of new tech. 

Yet underneath this drive within companies to be innovative there lies the core reality that it all comes back to how consumers - and human beings in general - are able to utilize technology overall, and in this case the cloud specifically, to bolster quality of life. 

Stress is an issue so widespread in varying degrees, its significance is often underrated. But, what research shows is that stress contributes to a wide range of serious chronic diseases. It's an inevitable part of life that we all deal with at one time or another, but it doesn't have be a serious game changer. 

The cloud can provide a method for individuals to regulate their stress on a daily basis in a way that previous generations never before had the ability to do; ultimately that means stress as a whole may take a back seat for some individuals, which is right where it belongs.

Ditching Legacy Systems: Why Moving Payroll to the Cloud is Beneficial


Article Written by Avery Phillips

While using the cloud to handle payroll is nothing new - it was already in use in 2011 - bigger companies have been slower to adapt than small businesses and startups. Let's look at why companies would be better off following the fairly recent trend of ditching legacy systems and migrating to the cloud.

The Legacy System and Security

Genomics & the Cloud: What's Next?

Article Written by Avery Phillips

Saving patient data to the cloud can mean using big data to improve medicine and discover problems that doctors might have missed. Uploading an entire gene sequence and studying the sequence - a branch of molecular biology known as genomics - could have an even bigger impact on medicine as a whole in the coming years. Let's look at the good and bad of the future of genomics and the cloud.

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Personalized Gene Editing

One of the biggest advancements in recent years is CRISPR, a method of editing genes that has made editing individual genes much easier and cheaper than in the past. It can be used to fight world hunger by making plants produce more fruit or become more resistant to anything from weather, insects, or blight, and even edit a person's genes. It's not quite at the stage where it's ready for humans, but it's close. 

Now, combine an easy way to edit genes with big data. First, the patient's gene sequence is uploaded to the cloud. This lets a computer comb through and identify what could be changed with CRISPR, to either reduce the chance for disease or eliminate it entirely could be in our near future. It seems like something out of a sci-fi movie, but it could very soon be a reality. Using big data to essentially crowdsource the solution to medical problems is not new, however.

Careers in Health Informatics & the Cloud



Article Written by Avery Phillips

Thanks to big data, the cloud, and the ever-advancing march of technology, the face of healthcare is changing. With that comes the need for additional staff trained in how to use technology to its fullest in order to better serve patients. From treating chronic diseases through research, management, and prevention, to trying to combat SIDS in infants, let's look at at what these new careers do, and how they use the cloud to do their job.