Hoofer's blog

What are the Core SaaS, Cloud Skills?

Grazed from IT Business Edge.  Author: Susan Hall.

Microsoft's Jobs Blog a while back addressed what that company looks for as "cloud computing skills" in job applicants. The answer? Basically experience with large-scale software-as-a-service (SaaS) projects or infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) initiatives.

 

NephoScale Jumps Into IaaS Cloud Market

Grazed from Network Computing.  Author: Robert Mullins.

There's a new entrant in the growing infrastructure as a service (IaaS) cloud market that is claiming innovative technology rivaling that of established players such as Amazon EC2, Rackspace and Go Grid. NephoScale says that its cloud infrastructure is built from the ground up to overcome some of the limitations of legacy cloud providers.

NephoScale, which has been in beta testing for eight months and emerged from stealth mode just two weeks ago, introduced on Jan. 11 its IaaS offering. It includes an application programming interface (API) for customers that simplifies movement of IT resources to the cloud.

The Year in Computing

Grazed from MIT Technology Review.  Author: Tom Simonite.

Cloud Computing: How Cloud Computing Shifts the VAR Model

Grazed from Channel Pro.  Author:  Colleen Frye.

Douglas Toombs is a senior analyst at Tier1 Research, a division of The 451 Group, where he covers managed services and cloud computing. In this conversation with writer Colleen Frye, Toombs notes some key trends, and why SMBs and the channel should get onboard and leverage their status as trusted partner.

ChannelPro-SMB: What are some key trends in managed services, and which are pertinent to SMBs?

Research Report: 2011 Cloud Computing Predictions For Vendors And Solution Providers

Grazed from Forbes.  Author:  Chirag Mheta.

The Cloud: More Than Just Dollars and Cents

Grazed from IT Business Edge.  Author: Arthur Cole.

The waning days of December have brought out the usual raft of year-end reviews coupled with year-ahead predictions, and it's no surprise that the current crop of enterprise-related round-ups focuses primarily on the cloud.


As the most significant shift in data infrastructure since, well, the creation of data infrastructure, the cloud is seen as both inevitable and far-reaching in its potential to radically reshape the entire IT industry. But mixed in with all this enthusiasm, a bit of caution: For every predictable outcome from the cloud there will be multiple unpredictable ones.

Managing Yum Plugins

Grazed from ServerWatch.  Author: Joe Brockmeier.

Yum is one of the most widely used package management tools, but many users don't know that Yum has a plugin system to extend its capabilities. Let's take a look at how to extend Yum to add some very useful features.

If you're using Fedora, Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), CentOS, or a number of other RPM-based systems, you are probably very familiar with using Yum to install packages and update your system. It's very useful out of the box, so to speak, but it can be extended to add even more functionality.

A Glimmer of Security Hope for 2011

Grazed from IT Business Edge.  Author: Michael Vizard.

We’ve been talking as an industry about the convergence of security and IT operations management for the better part of a decade.

Security Questions to Ask Before Engaging with Cloud Providers

Grazed from GigaOM.  Author: Tom Mornini.

For Wall Street Firms, Cloud Computing to Gain Momentum in 2011

Grazed from Wall Street & Technology.  Author: Melanie Rodier.

Why It's Important: Cloud computing is gaining momentum quickly on Wall Street. In a 2010 Wall Street & Technology/ InformationWeek Analytics survey of 144 capital markets executives, 40 percent said their firms already use some type of cloud, while an additional 31 percent said they are considering it. "The current trend is how to optimize your footprint and minimize what you have to expend in capitalization, while maximizing performance," says Mark Popolano, a senior advisor with Ineum Consulting and a former AIG CIO. The cloud fits the bill perfectly, he notes.